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152111932 Criterion TheatreReferenceBusinesses, TheatreBar Harbor35 Cottage StreetThe Criterion Theatre is a cinema, performance theatre, and venue located on Cottage Street in Bar Harbor, Maine. It opened in June 1932 featuring vaudeville performances and movies during a time when Bar Harbor's summer scene was at its height. Today it is one of only two Art Deco theaters in the state of Maine and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The 760 seat theatre was built for a convicted bootlegger named George McKay. After his release from federal prison, McKay solicited bids for constructions of a glamorous movie palace. The high bid of $95,206 was beat by Bunker & Savage Architects of Augusta, Maine who built the theatre in just six months for a contract price of $58,000. That's about $900,000 in today's dollars, a surprisingly low figure for such a magnificent structure. A $2 million dollar contribution from an anonymous donor in 2014 made possible the purchase and restoration of the Criterion which now operates as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization committed to safeguarding this historic space for stories, storytellers, and audiences. Today, almost everything in the building is original or as close as possible to it, including the light fixtures, curtains, seats, and stencils on the ceiling.
Description:
The Criterion Theatre is a cinema, performance theatre, and venue located on Cottage Street in Bar Harbor, Maine. It opened in June 1932 featuring vaudeville performances and movies during a time when Bar Harbor's summer scene was at its height. Today it is one of only two Art Deco theaters in the state of Maine and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The 760 seat theatre was built for a convicted bootlegger named George McKay. After his release from federal prison, McKay solicited bids for constructions of a glamorous movie palace. The high bid of $95,206 was beat by Bunker & Savage Architects of Augusta, Maine who built the theatre in just six months for a contract price of $58,000. That's about $900,000 in today's dollars, a surprisingly low figure for such a magnificent structure. A $2 million dollar contribution from an anonymous donor in 2014 made possible the purchase and restoration of the Criterion which now operates as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization committed to safeguarding this historic space for stories, storytellers, and audiences. Today, almost everything in the building is original or as close as possible to it, including the light fixtures, curtains, seats, and stencils on the ceiling. [show more]
15210Interior Panorama of 1932 Criterion TheatreImage, Photograph, DigitalBusinesses, TheatreSoules - George John Soules2016-02-13Bar HarborGeorge Soules photographed the interior of the Criterion from the balcony with a Canon 5D Mark III DSLR and a Canon 24mm tilt/shift lens using available light, which there was little of. To the naked eye, the space does not look nearly this bright. The first image (angle view) is a four-slice panorama with a 140° field of view. It is a composite of 12 different frames. The second image (straight-on view) is a six-slice panorama with a 190° field of view. It is a composite of 18 different frames. Both images were shot at f/8, ISO 400, with three different exposures for each slice. Exposures ranged from 10 seconds for the main room to 1/25th second for the chandelier.
Description:
George Soules photographed the interior of the Criterion from the balcony with a Canon 5D Mark III DSLR and a Canon 24mm tilt/shift lens using available light, which there was little of. To the naked eye, the space does not look nearly this bright. The first image (angle view) is a four-slice panorama with a 140° field of view. It is a composite of 12 different frames. The second image (straight-on view) is a six-slice panorama with a 190° field of view. It is a composite of 18 different frames. Both images were shot at f/8, ISO 400, with three different exposures for each slice. Exposures ranged from 10 seconds for the main room to 1/25th second for the chandelier. [show more]
15127Daniel Leland Jr. HouseReferenceStructures, Dwelling, HouseBar Harbor945 Bar Harbor RoadAccording to Robert Leland, father of Patti Leland of Trenton, in 1849 this house was moved to its present location at 945 Bar Harbor Road, Map 19 – Lot 6 from about a quarter of a mile closer to Mount Desert Island (probably near 1007 Bar Harbor Road, Map 15 – Lot 16). The house was probably moved by Daniel Leland Jr. (1929-). The 1840 census has both Daniel Leland, born in 1874, and Daniel Leland Jr., born in 1829, living in the houses. Reportedly the house was built c. 1802 although this information has yet to be verified. When Willis Ballard photographed the house in 1962 it was owned by Maurice Clements. The house is now [2014] painted red and the original outbuildings are gone, perhaps due to fire, according to Patti Leland. The Bar Harbor Road has been widened so the house now lies closer to the road, although it is more difficult to see as trees have grown up around it.
Description:
According to Robert Leland, father of Patti Leland of Trenton, in 1849 this house was moved to its present location at 945 Bar Harbor Road, Map 19 – Lot 6 from about a quarter of a mile closer to Mount Desert Island (probably near 1007 Bar Harbor Road, Map 15 – Lot 16). The house was probably moved by Daniel Leland Jr. (1929-). The 1840 census has both Daniel Leland, born in 1874, and Daniel Leland Jr., born in 1829, living in the houses. Reportedly the house was built c. 1802 although this information has yet to be verified. When Willis Ballard photographed the house in 1962 it was owned by Maurice Clements. The house is now [2014] painted red and the original outbuildings are gone, perhaps due to fire, according to Patti Leland. The Bar Harbor Road has been widened so the house now lies closer to the road, although it is more difficult to see as trees have grown up around it. [show more]
15113Jackson LaboratoryReferenceBusinesses, Other
Structures, Commercial
Bar Harbor600 Main StreetOriginally the site of Robin Hood Park
Description:
Originally the site of Robin Hood Park
14797Huguenot Head
Pickett Mountain
ReferencePlaces, MountainBar HarborHuguenot Head
Huguenot Head
Pickett Mountain
14433Bar Harbor RecordReferenceOther, NewsBar Harbor
144321889 Bar Harbor Record Newspaper from March 14Publication, NewspaperOther, News1889-03-14Bar Harbor
144311967 Bar Harbor Times Newspaper, Fire of 1947 Anniversary SupplementPublication, NewspaperEvents, FireThe Bar Harbor Times1967-10-19Bar HarborA 12 page special supplement published on the 20th anniversary of the 1947 Bar Harbor Fire.
Description:
A 12 page special supplement published on the 20th anniversary of the 1947 Bar Harbor Fire.
14168Ernest Emery Photography StudioReferenceBusinesses, StudioBar Harbor
14162I.T. Moore's Photography StudioReferenceBusinesses, StudioBar Harbor
13470Indian Camp at Bar Harbor, Second LocationReferencePlaces, CampBar Harbor
13463Newport HouseReferenceStructures, Commercial, Lodging, HotelBar Harbor
13427Rodick House HotelReferenceStructures, Commercial, Lodging, HotelBar Harbor
13285West End HotelReferenceStructures, Commercial, Lodging, HotelBar Harbor
13256Malvern HotelReferenceStructures, Commercial, Lodging, HotelBar Harbor80 Mt. Desert Street
13214Bar Harbor Shore PathReferencePlaces, ShoreBar Harbor
13204Bar HarborReferencePlaces, TownBar Harbor
13203Balance RockReferencePlaces, ShoreBar Harbor"Balance Rock still remains along the Shore Path at the foot of Grant’s Park, also known as Albert’s Meadow. This erratic granite, a type of rock different from the sedimentary strata it rests upon. Geologists believe that the huge boulder was left behind by a retreating glacier." - “Bygone Bar Harbor: A Postcard Tour of Mount Desert Island and Acadia National Park” by Earl Brechlin, p. 20 - 2002 "Mount Desert Island was host to the Laurentide Ice Sheet as it extended and receded during the Pleistocene epoch. The glacier left a number of visible marks upon the landscape, such as Bubble Rock, a glacial erratic carried 19 miles by the ice sheet from a Lucerne granite outcrop and deposited precariously on the side of South Bubble Mountain in Acadia National Park. Other such examples are the moraines deposited at the southern ends of many of the glacier-carved valleys on the Island such as the Jordan Pond valley, indicating the extent of the glacier; and the beach sediments located in a regressional sequence beneath and around Jordan Pond, indicating the rebound of the continent after the glacier's recession approximately 25,000 years ago." - Gilman, R.A., Chapman, C.A., Lowell, T.V., and Borns, H.W., 1988, "Shaping of the Landscape by Glacial Erosion, in The geology of Mount Desert Island: Augusta, Maine Geological Survey Bulletin 38."
Description:
"Balance Rock still remains along the Shore Path at the foot of Grant’s Park, also known as Albert’s Meadow. This erratic granite, a type of rock different from the sedimentary strata it rests upon. Geologists believe that the huge boulder was left behind by a retreating glacier." - “Bygone Bar Harbor: A Postcard Tour of Mount Desert Island and Acadia National Park” by Earl Brechlin, p. 20 - 2002 "Mount Desert Island was host to the Laurentide Ice Sheet as it extended and receded during the Pleistocene epoch. The glacier left a number of visible marks upon the landscape, such as Bubble Rock, a glacial erratic carried 19 miles by the ice sheet from a Lucerne granite outcrop and deposited precariously on the side of South Bubble Mountain in Acadia National Park. Other such examples are the moraines deposited at the southern ends of many of the glacier-carved valleys on the Island such as the Jordan Pond valley, indicating the extent of the glacier; and the beach sediments located in a regressional sequence beneath and around Jordan Pond, indicating the rebound of the continent after the glacier's recession approximately 25,000 years ago." - Gilman, R.A., Chapman, C.A., Lowell, T.V., and Borns, H.W., 1988, "Shaping of the Landscape by Glacial Erosion, in The geology of Mount Desert Island: Augusta, Maine Geological Survey Bulletin 38." [show more]
13164Eden Hall: Summer Home of T.B. MusgravePublication, ClippingPeople
Structures, Dwelling, House
1895-06-18Bar Harbor
13163Eden HallReferenceStructures, Dwelling, HouseBar Harbor30 Atlantic Ave
13162Musgrave Tea TowerReferenceStructures, Other, TowerBar Harbor30 Atlantic AveA landmark along the Shore Path was the Musgrave Tea Tower. In 1881, New York banker Thomas Musgrave built Edgemere, a Shingle-style cottage designed by William R. Emerson. Five years later he added a second cottage, Mare Vista, to his property. Musgrave's tower contained a second-floor tearoom and an attached bowling alley and dance hall." - "Bar Harbor" by Earle G. Shettleworth Jr., Postcard Series, Arcadia Publishing, Charleston, South Carolina, 2011, p. 50. The Musgrave Tea Tower was built by Thomas Bateson Musgrave (1831-1903) and his wife, Frances 'Fannie' Eleanor (Jones) Musgrave. Archivists researching the life of the Musgraves embark upon a sea of stories combining opulence, litigation and controversy.
Description:
A landmark along the Shore Path was the Musgrave Tea Tower. In 1881, New York banker Thomas Musgrave built Edgemere, a Shingle-style cottage designed by William R. Emerson. Five years later he added a second cottage, Mare Vista, to his property. Musgrave's tower contained a second-floor tearoom and an attached bowling alley and dance hall." - "Bar Harbor" by Earle G. Shettleworth Jr., Postcard Series, Arcadia Publishing, Charleston, South Carolina, 2011, p. 50. The Musgrave Tea Tower was built by Thomas Bateson Musgrave (1831-1903) and his wife, Frances 'Fannie' Eleanor (Jones) Musgrave. Archivists researching the life of the Musgraves embark upon a sea of stories combining opulence, litigation and controversy. [show more]
13042Robin Hood ParkReferencePlacesBar Harbor
13027Porcupine Hotel
Hotel Florence
ReferenceStructures, Commercial, Lodging, HotelBar Harbor“…the…Hotel Porcupine, later the Florence (1887; burned, 1918), a Main Street, five-story rectangular block with Shingle-style features and a strong sense of verticality represented by its stacked window bays, bay roof caps, steep-pitched roof planes, and tall, corbelled brick chimneys…represented [with the larger Malvern Hotel] an impressive conclusion to Bar Harbor’s opulent Victorian hotel era.” - “Summer By The Seaside: The Architecture of New England Coastal Resort Hotels, 1820-1950” by Bryant F. Tolles, Jr., p. 165, 170, University Press of New England – 2008 - An excellent study including information about The Island House in Southwest Harbor and its place in the range of hotels on the island during this period along with a very complete history of many of the Bar Harbor hotels.
Porcupine Hotel
Hotel Florence
Description:
“…the…Hotel Porcupine, later the Florence (1887; burned, 1918), a Main Street, five-story rectangular block with Shingle-style features and a strong sense of verticality represented by its stacked window bays, bay roof caps, steep-pitched roof planes, and tall, corbelled brick chimneys…represented [with the larger Malvern Hotel] an impressive conclusion to Bar Harbor’s opulent Victorian hotel era.” - “Summer By The Seaside: The Architecture of New England Coastal Resort Hotels, 1820-1950” by Bryant F. Tolles, Jr., p. 165, 170, University Press of New England – 2008 - An excellent study including information about The Island House in Southwest Harbor and its place in the range of hotels on the island during this period along with a very complete history of many of the Bar Harbor hotels. [show more]
13023Kennedy Cottage - KenardenReferenceStructures, Dwelling, CottageBar Harbor
13021A. Bird Cough StoreReferenceBusinesses, StoreBar Harbor"A. Bird Cough [Adoniram Bird Cough] has opened a most attractive store at 26 Cottage Street. The store is stocked with a fine line of groceries and the usual vegetable lines." - The Bar Harbor Record, June 16, 1909 - quoted in The Bar Harbor Times, June 18, 2009, p. 34. A. Bird Cough was Daniel and Elvira's son Adoniram Bird Cough (1872-1949) who opened his store in Bar Harbor in the 6th building from Main Street on the south side of Cottage Street, a site occupied by Cadillac Mt. Sports in 2013.
Description:
"A. Bird Cough [Adoniram Bird Cough] has opened a most attractive store at 26 Cottage Street. The store is stocked with a fine line of groceries and the usual vegetable lines." - The Bar Harbor Record, June 16, 1909 - quoted in The Bar Harbor Times, June 18, 2009, p. 34. A. Bird Cough was Daniel and Elvira's son Adoniram Bird Cough (1872-1949) who opened his store in Bar Harbor in the 6th building from Main Street on the south side of Cottage Street, a site occupied by Cadillac Mt. Sports in 2013. [show more]