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Item Title Type Subject Creator Publisher Date Place Address Description
15615A Cheese-shaped BuildingPublication, ArticleStructures, Commercial, StoreSambides - Nick Sambides Jr.Bangor Daily News2019-01-09Trenton874 Bar Harbor Road (Route 3)A Bangor Daily News article about an urban legend hiding in plain sight.
Description:
A Bangor Daily News article about an urban legend hiding in plain sight.
15547Ocean View Cabins on Route 3 in Seal HarborImage, Postcard, PictureStructures, Commercial, Lodging, CabinLuther S. Phillips, Bangor, Maine1959 PMMount Desert, Seal HarborAccording to Earl Brechlin, the location of the cabins appears to be just east of Little Harbor Brook between Seal Harbor and Northeast Harbor. The view is looking towards the southwest from the hill on the north side of Route 3. If you zoom in above the place you can just make out the bridge over the stream which is tidal at that point. The little island fits with topos of the area. There's a large estate there now. The back of the card indicates that the cabins were owned by Arthur and Evelyn Gibbs.
Description:
According to Earl Brechlin, the location of the cabins appears to be just east of Little Harbor Brook between Seal Harbor and Northeast Harbor. The view is looking towards the southwest from the hill on the north side of Route 3. If you zoom in above the place you can just make out the bridge over the stream which is tidal at that point. The little island fits with topos of the area. There's a large estate there now. The back of the card indicates that the cabins were owned by Arthur and Evelyn Gibbs. [show more]
15537Parker WharfReferenceStructures, Commercial, WharfTremont, Bernard
15393Photographs of Beal's Fish WharfImage, PhotographStructures, CommercialSouthwest Harbor182 Clark Point RoadBeals Lobster Wharf Photographs Above - Beals Lobster Wharf – probably new 1932-1935 construction Three Sisters with staysail? Other Images: 1 - 36’ Newman 5 - Town Dock – Bait truck backed over the edge 6 - Doug Sr. 8 - Sandy Sandra Jellison Sullivan and Rosie 9 - Left to right: Sandra Sullivan, Elmer Buzzy Beal, Harold Beal, Douggy Beal, Sam Beal, unknown man in back. 10 - Vessel MS4909W – Raymond Bunker boat? 11 - Crew 1996 – includes Patti Tinker, Danielle Pelletier, Rose Gray. Photographer: Robin Farrin 12 - Carlton Smith photograph 18 - Samuel Wayne Beal aka Sam (1945-2011) and Molly shoveling snow Winter 2000-2001 19 - August 1998 29 - Sam Beal and aftermath of the truck accident at the wharf. The green gray boat is the “The Lost Airman” belongs to Andy May Barge behind is the "Charles Bradley" Bass Harbor owned by Wilfred M. Minctons (1962-). Charles Bradley Construction Company barge Capt. "Wid" Minctons. He specializes in Marine Construction and repair. 30 - Phase I almost completed 31 - Phase I completed – view from Coast Guard side 32 - Phase I completed – Shows “The Gangplank” & Coast Guard housing 33 - Phase I completed – Shows “The Gangplank” & Coast Guard housing 34 - August 1998 – beginning Phase I 35 - Harbor side before remodel 36 - Phase I completed. Summer 2000 “A hole like a missing tooth. Buildings built in 1932-1935 are gone.” – Sam Beal 37 - Phase II - Beginning demolition 38 - Phase II - Beginning demolition 39 - Phase I completed – shows new harbor side landing 40 - Phase I – end completed – tearing up the wharf for the restaurant pavilion 41 - Winter 2000-2001 – remodel half done – looking toward Clark Point Road – new restaurant pavilion on left – old bldg on right 42 - Maggie Dalzell and Bud Higgins in the kitchen – c. 1983-1986 43 - Wendy Dolliver – Melissa and Don Walls – 1985 Wendy P. Dolliver (1967-) ? Donald W. Walls (1953-) ? Melissa Walls – daughter ? 44 - Beals Wharf – c. 1981 45 - Beals Wharf – c. 1981 46 - 715 lb Tuna, Caught July 29, 1955, Francis Fernald and son Jerry, Francis Griffen Fernald (1909-1999) ?Gerard F. Fernald (1937-) ? Photographer W.H. Ballard 47-51 - 1992 – Moving Captain’s Galley and other bldg 52-53 - 1992 – Extending and rebuilding the wharf 54 - 1997 – sent a trap to this child’s school class 55 - Harold Beal 56 - August 1972 58 - Mac Pettigrow, Thurman Berry on left, Buzz Beal in back 59 - Buzz Beal 60 - Thurman Berry 61 - Thurman Berry older 62 - Shirley Phippen 63 - Retail sales – September 1988 65 - 1977 – Remodel 66 - 1977 – Coast Guard side 1932-1935 building – ready for hot top 67 - 1977 – Remodel 1932-1935 building racks on rough are fish flake 68 - Sunday, August 1977 – Minutes after opening, 1932-1935 building rebuilt 69 - 1977 remodel 72 - Stephen Brooks - 1997 73 - Ronald Warren’s boats at float, Mike Gilley on ramp, Summer 1982 74 - Bookkeeper Helen 75 - Sam Beal 80 - Edward M. – Bass Harbor – Old Underwood factory? 81 - Medric at SW Boat – Hornet at end of dock, Buzz Beal in rowboat? 83 - Picking shrimp 84-87 - 1932-1935 building goes down Phase I Construction – end of dock – probably 1998 Phase II Construction – restaurant and sales area - 2002
Description:
Beals Lobster Wharf Photographs Above - Beals Lobster Wharf – probably new 1932-1935 construction Three Sisters with staysail? Other Images: 1 - 36’ Newman 5 - Town Dock – Bait truck backed over the edge 6 - Doug Sr. 8 - Sandy Sandra Jellison Sullivan and Rosie 9 - Left to right: Sandra Sullivan, Elmer Buzzy Beal, Harold Beal, Douggy Beal, Sam Beal, unknown man in back. 10 - Vessel MS4909W – Raymond Bunker boat? 11 - Crew 1996 – includes Patti Tinker, Danielle Pelletier, Rose Gray. Photographer: Robin Farrin 12 - Carlton Smith photograph 18 - Samuel Wayne Beal aka Sam (1945-2011) and Molly shoveling snow Winter 2000-2001 19 - August 1998 29 - Sam Beal and aftermath of the truck accident at the wharf. The green gray boat is the “The Lost Airman” belongs to Andy May Barge behind is the "Charles Bradley" Bass Harbor owned by Wilfred M. Minctons (1962-). Charles Bradley Construction Company barge Capt. "Wid" Minctons. He specializes in Marine Construction and repair. 30 - Phase I almost completed 31 - Phase I completed – view from Coast Guard side 32 - Phase I completed – Shows “The Gangplank” & Coast Guard housing 33 - Phase I completed – Shows “The Gangplank” & Coast Guard housing 34 - August 1998 – beginning Phase I 35 - Harbor side before remodel 36 - Phase I completed. Summer 2000 “A hole like a missing tooth. Buildings built in 1932-1935 are gone.” – Sam Beal 37 - Phase II - Beginning demolition 38 - Phase II - Beginning demolition 39 - Phase I completed – shows new harbor side landing 40 - Phase I – end completed – tearing up the wharf for the restaurant pavilion 41 - Winter 2000-2001 – remodel half done – looking toward Clark Point Road – new restaurant pavilion on left – old bldg on right 42 - Maggie Dalzell and Bud Higgins in the kitchen – c. 1983-1986 43 - Wendy Dolliver – Melissa and Don Walls – 1985 Wendy P. Dolliver (1967-) ? Donald W. Walls (1953-) ? Melissa Walls – daughter ? 44 - Beals Wharf – c. 1981 45 - Beals Wharf – c. 1981 46 - 715 lb Tuna, Caught July 29, 1955, Francis Fernald and son Jerry, Francis Griffen Fernald (1909-1999) ?Gerard F. Fernald (1937-) ? Photographer W.H. Ballard 47-51 - 1992 – Moving Captain’s Galley and other bldg 52-53 - 1992 – Extending and rebuilding the wharf 54 - 1997 – sent a trap to this child’s school class 55 - Harold Beal 56 - August 1972 58 - Mac Pettigrow, Thurman Berry on left, Buzz Beal in back 59 - Buzz Beal 60 - Thurman Berry 61 - Thurman Berry older 62 - Shirley Phippen 63 - Retail sales – September 1988 65 - 1977 – Remodel 66 - 1977 – Coast Guard side 1932-1935 building – ready for hot top 67 - 1977 – Remodel 1932-1935 building racks on rough are fish flake 68 - Sunday, August 1977 – Minutes after opening, 1932-1935 building rebuilt 69 - 1977 remodel 72 - Stephen Brooks - 1997 73 - Ronald Warren’s boats at float, Mike Gilley on ramp, Summer 1982 74 - Bookkeeper Helen 75 - Sam Beal 80 - Edward M. – Bass Harbor – Old Underwood factory? 81 - Medric at SW Boat – Hornet at end of dock, Buzz Beal in rowboat? 83 - Picking shrimp 84-87 - 1932-1935 building goes down Phase I Construction – end of dock – probably 1998 Phase II Construction – restaurant and sales area - 2002 [show more]
15333Sea Wall House HotelReferenceStructures, Commercial, Lodging, HotelSouthwest Harbor, Seawall“In 1882 Dr. Sophia Thompson of Boston built a large hotel and stable at Seawall for summer business to be conducted by her son, Smith Mooney. The hotel was well finished and furnished with fine furniture, but it was too far away from the village; when the fog was in it was cold and dreary and the installation of a bell buoy on a reef off the shore kept the guests awake with its gloomy tolling, so it was not successful and after a few years the furnishings were sold and the buildings taken down. When the hotel was built the old Whitmore house was still standing and part of it was used as a shed.” - “Traditions and Records of Southwest Harbor and Somesville, Mount Desert Island, Maine” by Mrs. Seth S. Thornton, p. 206 - 1938 “To those who are looking up an agreeable and pleasant place to spend a few weeks of the summer, we can cheerfully recommend South West Harbor, Mount Desert, on the coast of Maine, as possessing most superior and attractive surroundings to enchant the tourist. The Sea Wall House, with its pleasant adjoining cottage, will be managed by mine host D.S. Mooney, which is a sufficient guarantee that every comfort and want of the guests will be looked after. Large and airy rooms, nicely furnished, with plenty of fishing, gunning, boating and bathing in the immediate vicinity, together with an unsurpassed mountain scenery, all at reasonable prices, await the patrons of the Sea Wall House.” – “The Sea Wall House, South West Harbor, Mount Desert, Me.” – Boston Daily Globe, p. 10 - June 8, 1884. While this may sound like a review of the hotel, it is probably an advertisement by the hotel.
Description:
“In 1882 Dr. Sophia Thompson of Boston built a large hotel and stable at Seawall for summer business to be conducted by her son, Smith Mooney. The hotel was well finished and furnished with fine furniture, but it was too far away from the village; when the fog was in it was cold and dreary and the installation of a bell buoy on a reef off the shore kept the guests awake with its gloomy tolling, so it was not successful and after a few years the furnishings were sold and the buildings taken down. When the hotel was built the old Whitmore house was still standing and part of it was used as a shed.” - “Traditions and Records of Southwest Harbor and Somesville, Mount Desert Island, Maine” by Mrs. Seth S. Thornton, p. 206 - 1938 “To those who are looking up an agreeable and pleasant place to spend a few weeks of the summer, we can cheerfully recommend South West Harbor, Mount Desert, on the coast of Maine, as possessing most superior and attractive surroundings to enchant the tourist. The Sea Wall House, with its pleasant adjoining cottage, will be managed by mine host D.S. Mooney, which is a sufficient guarantee that every comfort and want of the guests will be looked after. Large and airy rooms, nicely furnished, with plenty of fishing, gunning, boating and bathing in the immediate vicinity, together with an unsurpassed mountain scenery, all at reasonable prices, await the patrons of the Sea Wall House.” – “The Sea Wall House, South West Harbor, Mount Desert, Me.” – Boston Daily Globe, p. 10 - June 8, 1884. While this may sound like a review of the hotel, it is probably an advertisement by the hotel. [show more]
15213The Saranac InnReferenceStructures, Commercial, Lodging, InnSaranac Lake
15146W.H. Thurston StoreReferenceBusinesses, Store
Structures, Commercial, Store
15113Jackson LaboratoryReferenceBusinesses, Other
Structures, Commercial
Bar Harbor600 Main StreetOriginally the site of Robin Hood Park
Description:
Originally the site of Robin Hood Park
15111Higgins WharfReferenceStructures, Commercial, Wharf
15106The Captain's WalkReferenceStructures, Commercial, Store
15105The Live YankeeReferenceStructures, Commercial, Store“The Lurvey building [the Freeman J. Lurvey building on Main Street] was built as a general store and was conducted by Liston F. Smith for some years. Mr. Smith came to this vicinity some years previous and went over Mount Desert Island with a pedlar's [Sic] cart, calling himself "The Live Yankee." When he settled down to storekeeping- this was on his sign and by this cognomen he was known to most of the people. Later he moved his goods to one of the stores in the basement of the Masonic Hall where he was in business until failing health forced him to retire.” - “Traditions and Records of Southwest Harbor and Somesville, Mount Desert Island, Maine” by Mrs. Seth S. Thornton, 1938, p. 148-149.
Description:
“The Lurvey building [the Freeman J. Lurvey building on Main Street] was built as a general store and was conducted by Liston F. Smith for some years. Mr. Smith came to this vicinity some years previous and went over Mount Desert Island with a pedlar's [Sic] cart, calling himself "The Live Yankee." When he settled down to storekeeping- this was on his sign and by this cognomen he was known to most of the people. Later he moved his goods to one of the stores in the basement of the Masonic Hall where he was in business until failing health forced him to retire.” - “Traditions and Records of Southwest Harbor and Somesville, Mount Desert Island, Maine” by Mrs. Seth S. Thornton, 1938, p. 148-149. [show more]
15036Lyle Arlington Reed StoreReferenceBusinesses, Store
Structures, Commercial, Store
Tremont, Bass Harbor35 Shore RoadLyle Arlington Reed's store was opened in about 1945 in Bass Harbor. It was a general grocery and meat store and, later, a small lunch area for the nearby factory workers was added. Lyle sold the building to Dr. Channing H. Washburn of Bass Harbor who turned the building into a residence. - Information from Elsie V. (Reed) Lunt, Mrs. Clarence L. Lunt - Interview 09/22/10. "McKinley – The building on the Shore Road owned by Lyle Reed has been completed and the store will be opened in connection with his taxi business." The Ellsworth American, Wednesday, May 28, 1947.
Description:
Lyle Arlington Reed's store was opened in about 1945 in Bass Harbor. It was a general grocery and meat store and, later, a small lunch area for the nearby factory workers was added. Lyle sold the building to Dr. Channing H. Washburn of Bass Harbor who turned the building into a residence. - Information from Elsie V. (Reed) Lunt, Mrs. Clarence L. Lunt - Interview 09/22/10. "McKinley – The building on the Shore Road owned by Lyle Reed has been completed and the store will be opened in connection with his taxi business." The Ellsworth American, Wednesday, May 28, 1947. [show more]
15014Bernard Post Office
Hinton's Antique Shop
ReferenceStructures, Other, Post Office
Businesses, Shop
Structures, Commercial, Store
Tremont, Bernard129 Bernard RoadPostmasters at Bernard were: George W. Billings (1859-?): Postmaster - 11/26/1906 Hiram H. Condon (1871-1957): Postmaster - 10/17/1914 Mrs. Harriet C. Hinton (1904-1984): Acting Postmaster - 10/31/1941 Mrs. Harriet C. Hinton (1904-1984): Postmaster - 03/25/1942 Mrs. Hilda Erclin Sylvia (1912-2006): Officer-In-Charge - 06/20/1974 Mrs. Hilda Erclin Sylvia (1912-2006): Postmaster - 10/26/1974 Alice Ann Tracy - Officer-In-Charge: 05/01/1987 Linda (Sawyer) Musson (1949-): Postmaster -10/10/1987 Harriet Hinton was the postmaster - then her son Paul Hinton, had the antique store in this building.
Bernard Post Office
Hinton's Antique Shop
Description:
Postmasters at Bernard were: George W. Billings (1859-?): Postmaster - 11/26/1906 Hiram H. Condon (1871-1957): Postmaster - 10/17/1914 Mrs. Harriet C. Hinton (1904-1984): Acting Postmaster - 10/31/1941 Mrs. Harriet C. Hinton (1904-1984): Postmaster - 03/25/1942 Mrs. Hilda Erclin Sylvia (1912-2006): Officer-In-Charge - 06/20/1974 Mrs. Hilda Erclin Sylvia (1912-2006): Postmaster - 10/26/1974 Alice Ann Tracy - Officer-In-Charge: 05/01/1987 Linda (Sawyer) Musson (1949-): Postmaster -10/10/1987 Harriet Hinton was the postmaster - then her son Paul Hinton, had the antique store in this building. [show more]
14992Harding's WharfImage, PhotographOther, Lobster Trap
Structures, Commercial, Wharf
Places, Harbor
Soules - George John Soules1977Tremont, Bernard
14972The Village Wash Tub and Joey's Place in a BlizzardImage, Photograph, DigitalBusinesses, Laundromat
Structures, Commercial
Soules - George John Soules2017-02-13Southwest Harbor297 Main Street
14957Southwest Motor InnReferenceBusinesses, Lodging
Structures, Commercial, Lodging, Motel
214 Main StreetThe Motel, named the "Southwest Motor Inn," was built in 1970 and ran until 1980. New Motel Planned For Area "Southwest Harbor - Three businessmen here have combined resources to build a new 32-unit motel on Route 102 overlooking Norwood Cove. Foundation work is now being done and the motel will be ready for occupancy by June 1, said David Benson, one of the three partners. Druggist George McVety and lawyer Frederick Burrill are Benson's Associates in the business venture. The quarter-million-dollar motel will have two levels, with an outside corridor, plus an office and quarters for the manager. Hanson is acting as contractor for the project. The major subcontractor is John Goodwin, who is handling concrete work. The motel will be built entirely of concrete blocks. The three businessmen have not yet decided on a name for the new motel." - Bangor Daily News, 1971 The property was later Norwood Cove Housing, owned by the Ellsworth and MDI Housing Authorities who provide housing assistance and related services to individuals and families who face income or other life challenges.
Description:
The Motel, named the "Southwest Motor Inn," was built in 1970 and ran until 1980. New Motel Planned For Area "Southwest Harbor - Three businessmen here have combined resources to build a new 32-unit motel on Route 102 overlooking Norwood Cove. Foundation work is now being done and the motel will be ready for occupancy by June 1, said David Benson, one of the three partners. Druggist George McVety and lawyer Frederick Burrill are Benson's Associates in the business venture. The quarter-million-dollar motel will have two levels, with an outside corridor, plus an office and quarters for the manager. Hanson is acting as contractor for the project. The major subcontractor is John Goodwin, who is handling concrete work. The motel will be built entirely of concrete blocks. The three businessmen have not yet decided on a name for the new motel." - Bangor Daily News, 1971 The property was later Norwood Cove Housing, owned by the Ellsworth and MDI Housing Authorities who provide housing assistance and related services to individuals and families who face income or other life challenges. [show more]
14939The Glencove HotelReferenceStructures, Commercial, Lodging, HotelMount Desert, Seal Harbor
14855Charles Eaton Spurling StoreReferenceStructures, Commercial, StoreCranberry Isles, Great Cranberry Island45 Cranberry Road
14854The Old Narraguagus House, Cherryfield, MaineReferenceStructures, Commercial
14830Lobsterland RestaurantReferenceBusinesses, Restaurant
Structures, Commercial, Restaurant
Southwest Harbor, SeawallLobsterland was a restaurant and lobster pound at Seawall that burned on August 28, 1965. The building that became “Lobsterland” was bought by David B. Benson from Vera Rich (Vera A. (Beal) Rich (1918-1996), Mrs. Maurice Stanley Rich) who had used it as a playhouse when she took care of children. The original address of the building was 411 Main Street, Southwest Harbor. The house on the lot was built by Maurice and Vera Rich. It later became the Fiddlers Green Restaurant. Lobsterland Leveled The Bar Harbor Times, August, 1965 by LaRue Spiker "... Lobsterland, a restaurant and lobster pound at Seawall, was leveled by fire August 28. David Benson, owner of the Lobsterland building, stated that the structure and its equipment were a total loss but partially insured. The cause has not been determined. A number of people reported the fire. Two boys are thought to have been the first to spot it. They said they first noticed fire inside the building; a few seconds later there was a muffled explosion and the whole roof was ablaze. Another person first noticed the fire concentrated at the far end of the dining room where the heater was located. Another person thought the fire was first heaviest in the center of the building where the trash cans were kept, raising the possibility that a live cigarette butt had been deposited in one of them. The property had been leased by Jesse Forbis [Jesse Lee Forbis (1915-1982)] this summer for operation of the restaurant and pound. Mr. Benson stated that he has no plans for re-building this fall but may do so next spring."
Description:
Lobsterland was a restaurant and lobster pound at Seawall that burned on August 28, 1965. The building that became “Lobsterland” was bought by David B. Benson from Vera Rich (Vera A. (Beal) Rich (1918-1996), Mrs. Maurice Stanley Rich) who had used it as a playhouse when she took care of children. The original address of the building was 411 Main Street, Southwest Harbor. The house on the lot was built by Maurice and Vera Rich. It later became the Fiddlers Green Restaurant. Lobsterland Leveled The Bar Harbor Times, August, 1965 by LaRue Spiker "... Lobsterland, a restaurant and lobster pound at Seawall, was leveled by fire August 28. David Benson, owner of the Lobsterland building, stated that the structure and its equipment were a total loss but partially insured. The cause has not been determined. A number of people reported the fire. Two boys are thought to have been the first to spot it. They said they first noticed fire inside the building; a few seconds later there was a muffled explosion and the whole roof was ablaze. Another person first noticed the fire concentrated at the far end of the dining room where the heater was located. Another person thought the fire was first heaviest in the center of the building where the trash cans were kept, raising the possibility that a live cigarette butt had been deposited in one of them. The property had been leased by Jesse Forbis [Jesse Lee Forbis (1915-1982)] this summer for operation of the restaurant and pound. Mr. Benson stated that he has no plans for re-building this fall but may do so next spring." [show more]
14707Hotel HolmesReferenceStructures, Commercial, Lodging, HotelSouthwest Harbor
14437George W. Anderson House and Dental OfficeReferenceStructures, Commercial, Dental Office
Structures, Dwelling, House
Southwest Harbor, Manset140 Seawall Road"Next to the Ward house, now owned by William King, is one built in 1890 by Dr. George Anderson as a residence and dental office. It is now the property of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Reed." - "Traditions and Records of Southwest Harbor and Somesville, Mount Desert Island, Maine" by Mrs. Seth S. Thornton, 1938, p. 185.
Description:
"Next to the Ward house, now owned by William King, is one built in 1890 by Dr. George Anderson as a residence and dental office. It is now the property of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Reed." - "Traditions and Records of Southwest Harbor and Somesville, Mount Desert Island, Maine" by Mrs. Seth S. Thornton, 1938, p. 185.
14393Bar Harbor - Yarmouth Ferry TerminalReferenceStructures, Commercial
13878The Cheese HouseReferenceBusinesses, Store
Structures, Commercial, Store
"The Cheese House was part of the Cheese House chain which had 18 cheese-shaped locations in New England. Apparently, there are only … two buildings left. The stores were built in the late 1960s and early 1970s. They were constructed of wood with a cut-out wedge for the entrance and windows. They are 9' tall and 40' in diameter. In the late 1970s, the chain disbanded due to financial problems." - “Giant Food: Misc. Food” by Debra Jane Seltzer, Roadside Architecture.com, Accessed online 11/12/13; http://www.agilitynut.com/food/other.html The postcards for all the Cheeses Houses appear to be the same photograph. The store in Trenton was owned by Alex A. Albin and Bernice E. Albin. It closed in 1984 and the building has been for sale almost all the time since. Collectors of architectural oddities are always looking for such buildings, originally built as cheese wheels, hot dogs, clam boxes or loaves of bread.
Description:
"The Cheese House was part of the Cheese House chain which had 18 cheese-shaped locations in New England. Apparently, there are only … two buildings left. The stores were built in the late 1960s and early 1970s. They were constructed of wood with a cut-out wedge for the entrance and windows. They are 9' tall and 40' in diameter. In the late 1970s, the chain disbanded due to financial problems." - “Giant Food: Misc. Food” by Debra Jane Seltzer, Roadside Architecture.com, Accessed online 11/12/13; http://www.agilitynut.com/food/other.html The postcards for all the Cheeses Houses appear to be the same photograph. The store in Trenton was owned by Alex A. Albin and Bernice E. Albin. It closed in 1984 and the building has been for sale almost all the time since. Collectors of architectural oddities are always looking for such buildings, originally built as cheese wheels, hot dogs, clam boxes or loaves of bread. [show more]
13697Southwest Harbor Schoolhouse Building
Harmon Block
ReferenceStructures, Civic, School
Structures, Commercial
Southwest Harbor339 Main StreetBuilt in 1862 at 329 Main Street at the Southwest Harbor Schoolhouse Moved in 1906 to 339 Main Street, purchased by George Harmon and converted in to commercial space and apartments. "In 1906 the new town voted to build a new schoolhouse at the village and raised the sum of $4500 to do so. This sum included the purchase of additional land. The old building stood close to the main road and had but little land surrounding it, and the new one was to be set farther back with a playground in front of it. The old building was sold to George Harmon and moved to the lot south of the school lot where it is now used for stores and apartments. [Now the Harmon Block at 339 Main Street, Map 6 - Lot 93, MHPC #405-0081]
Description:
Built in 1862 at 329 Main Street at the Southwest Harbor Schoolhouse Moved in 1906 to 339 Main Street, purchased by George Harmon and converted in to commercial space and apartments. "In 1906 the new town voted to build a new schoolhouse at the village and raised the sum of $4500 to do so. This sum included the purchase of additional land. The old building stood close to the main road and had but little land surrounding it, and the new one was to be set farther back with a playground in front of it. The old building was sold to George Harmon and moved to the lot south of the school lot where it is now used for stores and apartments. [Now the Harmon Block at 339 Main Street, Map 6 - Lot 93, MHPC #405-0081] [show more]