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You searched for: Subject: is exactly 'Vessels, Steamboat'
Item Title Type Subject Creator Publisher Date Place Address Description
7114E.S.S. Horatio Hall at Portland, Maine
  • Image, Photograph, Picture Postcard
  • Vessels, Steamboat
  • Portland ME
14603Florence - Steamer
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Steamboat
The steamer, "Florence" was originally part of the fleet of Captain Gilbert Theodore Hadlock of the Cranberry Isles.
Description:
The steamer, "Florence" was originally part of the fleet of Captain Gilbert Theodore Hadlock of the Cranberry Isles.
6268Sidewheel Steamer Forest City and Steamer Florence at Southwest Harbor
  • Image, Photograph
  • Vessels, Steamboat
  • 1890 c.
  • Southwest Harbor
WRITTEN ON BACK: "Clark Point Wharf Southwest Harbor, Me Forest City (sister ship Lewiston) built in New York - 1854 - Boston - Bango route in 1880's Florence - small steamer in foreground - Blue Hill territory - chartered by Capt. Crockett Sign on a building at right - "International Express"
Description:
WRITTEN ON BACK: "Clark Point Wharf Southwest Harbor, Me Forest City (sister ship Lewiston) built in New York - 1854 - Boston - Bango route in 1880's Florence - small steamer in foreground - Blue Hill territory - chartered by Capt. Crockett Sign on a building at right - "International Express"
6806Steamship Cimbria in Southwest Harbor
  • Image, Photograph, Photographic Print, Stereograph
  • Vessels, Steamboat
  • Bradley - Bryant Bradley (1838-1890)
  • Photographed and Published by B. Bradley, Bar Harbor, Mt. Desert, Me.
  • 1878
  • Southwest Harbor
Bradley's title was, "Steamship "Cimbria" - S.W. Harbor, Mt. Desert, Me."
Description:
Bradley's title was, "Steamship "Cimbria" - S.W. Harbor, Mt. Desert, Me."
15294Cimbria - Passenger Steamer
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Steamboat
16299Steamer Cimbria Aground at Bass Harbor
  • Image, Photograph, Photographic Print
  • Vessels, Steamboat
  • 1898 c.
  • Tremont, Bass Harbor
6741Boston & Bangor Steamship Co. Receipt Envelope
  • Object, Merchandising, Money Container, Money Envelope
  • Vessels, Steamboat
  • 1903 c.
  • Southwest Harbor
Roderick Ariel Pepper (R.A. Pepper on this envelope) was a Director & Treasurer of The Eastern Steamship Company, India Wharf, Boston, in 1915.
Description:
Roderick Ariel Pepper (R.A. Pepper on this envelope) was a Director & Treasurer of The Eastern Steamship Company, India Wharf, Boston, in 1915.
13791Casco Bay Steamship Company
  • Reference
  • Businesses, Transportation Business
  • Vessels, Steamboat
10195Timetable for Sidewheel Steamer Rockland
  • Document, Schedule, Timetable
  • Vessels, Steamboat
  • 1856
  • Southwest Harbor
The timetable is signed by J.R. Freeman at Southwest Harbor.
Description:
The timetable is signed by J.R. Freeman at Southwest Harbor.
6721Steamer City of Rockland at the Eastern Steamship Company Wharf, Belfast, Maine
  • Image, Photograph, Picture Postcard
  • Vessels, Steamboat
  • The Hugh C. Leighton Company, Portland, Maine
  • Belfast ME
6527Steamer Norumbega Aground on Clark Point, Southwest Harbor, Maine
  • Image, Photograph
  • Vessels, Steamboat
  • 1912
  • Southwest Harbor
11264Mississippi Sternwheel Steamer at St. Louis, Missouri
  • Image, Photograph, Picture Postcard
  • Vessels, Steamboat
  • St Louis MO
15093Yarmouth - S.S. Yarmouth - Steamship
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Steamboat
“The “Yarmouth,” said to be the finest and fastest sea-going steamer owned in the Dominion of Canada, is 1,432 tons gross; was built at the Clyde by A. MacMillan & Son, in the early part of 1887, for £24,000 sterling; is of 2,200 horse-power, lighted by electricity, steered by steam-power; has the other modern improvements, and berths for 350 passengers. Already a favorite with the traveling public, this steamer makes semi-weekly trips between Yarmouth and Boston,: can make the passage, 240 miles, in 15 hours, but ordinarily occupies 16 to 17 hours. The “Yarmouth” is in charge of Capt. Harvey Doane, whose twenty years’ experience in steamers running to Yarmouth entitles him to the utmost confidence; and he is ably seconded by Capt. Samuel F. Stanwood, now acting pilot.” – “Yarmouth, Nova Scotia: A Sequel to Campbell’s History” by George S. Brown, Rand Avery Company, Printers, Boston, p. 505 – 1888. Photographer Henry L. Rand traveled from Yarmouth, Nova Scotia to Boston, Massachusetts on the “Yarmouth” arriving on July 26, 1894.
Description:
“The “Yarmouth,” said to be the finest and fastest sea-going steamer owned in the Dominion of Canada, is 1,432 tons gross; was built at the Clyde by A. MacMillan & Son, in the early part of 1887, for £24,000 sterling; is of 2,200 horse-power, lighted by electricity, steered by steam-power; has the other modern improvements, and berths for 350 passengers. Already a favorite with the traveling public, this steamer makes semi-weekly trips between Yarmouth and Boston,: can make the passage, 240 miles, in 15 hours, but ordinarily occupies 16 to 17 hours. The “Yarmouth” is in charge of Capt. Harvey Doane, whose twenty years’ experience in steamers running to Yarmouth entitles him to the utmost confidence; and he is ably seconded by Capt. Samuel F. Stanwood, now acting pilot.” – “Yarmouth, Nova Scotia: A Sequel to Campbell’s History” by George S. Brown, Rand Avery Company, Printers, Boston, p. 505 – 1888. Photographer Henry L. Rand traveled from Yarmouth, Nova Scotia to Boston, Massachusetts on the “Yarmouth” arriving on July 26, 1894. [show more]
14642J.T. Morse - Side-Wheel Steamer
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Steamboat
"The "J.T. Morse" was the last of the picturesque fleet of sidewheelers whose gleaming white hulls and long foaming white wakes were once such a decorative part of the Maine scene, set in the blue of Penobscot Bay against the green background of the mountains and the wooded offshore islands. The vessel was designed specifically for the Rockland-Bar Harbor Line, connecting the overnight Boston-to-Bangor steamers at Rockland. She was ordered as a replacement for the sidewheeler "Mount Desert," built at Bath in 1879, which by the turn of the century had become too small to handle the growing summer passenger and freight business…" "The "Morse" ran her last regular season in Maine in 1931…Steamer patronage had dwindled because of the competition from the automobile, and it was no longer profitable to operate her…" - Penobscot Bay, Mount Desert and Eastport Steamboat Album by Allie Ryan, p. 6 to 11 - 1972. These six pages tell the complete story of the "J.T. Morse."
Description:
"The "J.T. Morse" was the last of the picturesque fleet of sidewheelers whose gleaming white hulls and long foaming white wakes were once such a decorative part of the Maine scene, set in the blue of Penobscot Bay against the green background of the mountains and the wooded offshore islands. The vessel was designed specifically for the Rockland-Bar Harbor Line, connecting the overnight Boston-to-Bangor steamers at Rockland. She was ordered as a replacement for the sidewheeler "Mount Desert," built at Bath in 1879, which by the turn of the century had become too small to handle the growing summer passenger and freight business…" "The "Morse" ran her last regular season in Maine in 1931…Steamer patronage had dwindled because of the competition from the automobile, and it was no longer profitable to operate her…" - Penobscot Bay, Mount Desert and Eastport Steamboat Album by Allie Ryan, p. 6 to 11 - 1972. These six pages tell the complete story of the "J.T. Morse." [show more]
15947Solace - Steam Launch
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Steamboat
14442Norumbega - Passenger Steamer
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Steamboat
14638Moosehead - Passenger Steamer
Mayflower - Passenger Steamer
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Steamboat
"At the end of the first decade of the century management of the Maine Central Railroad decided it wanted more class and more power for its Mt. Desert Ferry steamers and directed Bath Iron Works to produce two vessels meeting these qualifications. They were the twin steamers, "Moosehead" and "Rangeley," both 185 feet long and named after two of Maine's largest lakes. "Moosehead came out first in 1911, with two triple expansion engines that could produce 2350 horsepower and give Bar Harbor rusticators a thrilling ride…" "During World War I, "Moosehead" was taken over by the Navy, but after the war returned to civilian service under the name first of "Porpoise" and later "Mayflower," running between New York and Bridgeport, Connecticut…" - Penobscot Bay, Mount Desert and Eastport Steamboat Album by Allie Ryan, p. 5 & 32 - 1972.
Moosehead - Passenger Steamer
Mayflower - Passenger Steamer
Description:
"At the end of the first decade of the century management of the Maine Central Railroad decided it wanted more class and more power for its Mt. Desert Ferry steamers and directed Bath Iron Works to produce two vessels meeting these qualifications. They were the twin steamers, "Moosehead" and "Rangeley," both 185 feet long and named after two of Maine's largest lakes. "Moosehead came out first in 1911, with two triple expansion engines that could produce 2350 horsepower and give Bar Harbor rusticators a thrilling ride…" "During World War I, "Moosehead" was taken over by the Navy, but after the war returned to civilian service under the name first of "Porpoise" and later "Mayflower," running between New York and Bridgeport, Connecticut…" - Penobscot Bay, Mount Desert and Eastport Steamboat Album by Allie Ryan, p. 5 & 32 - 1972. [show more]
14482Liberty - Sightseeing Boat
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Steamboat
15841Kronprinzessin Cecilie - Steamship
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Steamboat
Last of four ships of the Kaiser class, she was also the last German ship to have been built with four funnels. She was engaged in transatlantic service between her homeport of Bremen and New York until the outbreak of World War I when she sought safety at Bar Harbor. She was carrying c. $10,000,000 in gold and $3,400,000 in silver. "One morning in the summer of 1914 my husband got up and looked out the window, then called me and said in a tone of utter amazement, “There’s an ocean liner in the harbor.” Everyone knows the story of the "Kronprinzessin Cecile," how the news of the war had overtaken her in mid-ocean with her cargo of $10 million in American gold and a full complement of 1200 passengers…" - "Only in Maine: Selections from Down East Magazine," edited by Duane Doolittle, foreword by John Gould, “Old Bar Harbor Days” chapter by Marian L. Peabody, Downeast Enterprise Incorporated, Camden, Maine, 1969, p. 244.
Description:
Last of four ships of the Kaiser class, she was also the last German ship to have been built with four funnels. She was engaged in transatlantic service between her homeport of Bremen and New York until the outbreak of World War I when she sought safety at Bar Harbor. She was carrying c. $10,000,000 in gold and $3,400,000 in silver. "One morning in the summer of 1914 my husband got up and looked out the window, then called me and said in a tone of utter amazement, “There’s an ocean liner in the harbor.” Everyone knows the story of the "Kronprinzessin Cecile," how the news of the war had overtaken her in mid-ocean with her cargo of $10 million in American gold and a full complement of 1200 passengers…" - "Only in Maine: Selections from Down East Magazine," edited by Duane Doolittle, foreword by John Gould, “Old Bar Harbor Days” chapter by Marian L. Peabody, Downeast Enterprise Incorporated, Camden, Maine, 1969, p. 244. [show more]
13888Forest City - Sidewheel Walking Beam Passenger Steamer
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Steamboat
13792Emita - Passenger Steamer
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Steamboat
15365S.S. Columbia - Auxiliary Sail Passenger Steamship
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Steamboat
“It can be appropriately said of the new and magnificent steamship Columbia, of the Hamburg Line, that she is a "gem of the ocean." The accounts of her remarkably fast runs continue to be published in leading journals at home and abroad...” Source: Ocean: Magazine of Travel, Vol. III, No. 2, September 1889, Page 42 Information from various sources including Lloyd’s Register of British and Foreign Shipping.
Description:
“It can be appropriately said of the new and magnificent steamship Columbia, of the Hamburg Line, that she is a "gem of the ocean." The accounts of her remarkably fast runs continue to be published in leading journals at home and abroad...” Source: Ocean: Magazine of Travel, Vol. III, No. 2, September 1889, Page 42 Information from various sources including Lloyd’s Register of British and Foreign Shipping.
14389City of Rockland - Sidewheel Steamer
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Steamboat
15091Adelita II - Steam Yacht
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Steamboat
“Mr. F.H. Peabody, of Boston, owner of the old “Adelita,” built a larger steam yacht, and gave it the name of the “Adelita.” It is of wood, and was launched late last year from the yard of D.J. Lawlor, of East Boston. She is 95 feet over all, 80 feet on water line, and 16 feet beam. Her engines are of the compound inverted type, 22 1/2 and 15 inches by 14 inches stroke, is fitted with a steel boiler, 7 feet 6 inches by 9 feet.” – “A Chronological History of the Origin and Development of Steam Navigation” by George Henry Preble and John Lipton Lochhead, published by L.R. Hamersly, 1883.
Description:
“Mr. F.H. Peabody, of Boston, owner of the old “Adelita,” built a larger steam yacht, and gave it the name of the “Adelita.” It is of wood, and was launched late last year from the yard of D.J. Lawlor, of East Boston. She is 95 feet over all, 80 feet on water line, and 16 feet beam. Her engines are of the compound inverted type, 22 1/2 and 15 inches by 14 inches stroke, is fitted with a steel boiler, 7 feet 6 inches by 9 feet.” – “A Chronological History of the Origin and Development of Steam Navigation” by George Henry Preble and John Lipton Lochhead, published by L.R. Hamersly, 1883. [show more]
15832Boston Floating Hospital - Steamer
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Steamboat