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Item Title Type Subject Creator Publisher Date Place Address Description
11718Freighter Unloading Coal at the J.T.R. FreemanCoal Wharf, Southwest Harbor
  • Image, Photograph
  • Vessels, Ship
  • 1923 c.
  • Southwest Harbor
  • 12 Apple Lane
Vessel's name appears to be Tohickon, named after Tohickon Creek in Pennsylvania. This vessel was built in 1913 in Philadephia, PA.
Description:
Vessel's name appears to be Tohickon, named after Tohickon Creek in Pennsylvania. This vessel was built in 1913 in Philadephia, PA.
12241Commodore Arthur Curtiss James' Brigantine Aloha I at Southwest Harbor
  • Image, Photograph
  • Vessels, Ship
  • 1902-08-15
  • Southwest Harbor
12242Commodore Arthur Curtiss James' Brigantine Aloha and Steam Yacht Lorna at Southwest Harbor
  • Image, Photograph
  • Vessels, Ship
  • 1902-08-15
  • Southwest Harbor
16217Balance Rock and Frigate Portsmouth
  • Image, Photograph, Photographic Print, Stereograph
  • Places, Shore
  • Vessels, Ship
  • Kilburn - Benjamin West Kilburn (1827-1909)
  • Bar Harbor
6876Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, June 1, 1878
  • Publication, Newsletter
  • Vessels, Ship
  • 1878-06-01
Harry Alexander Ogden's famous drawing of the S.S. Cambria. The article begins: "In the landlocked waters of Southwest Harbor lies the now muchly talked of Cambria. A more adroit selection for a quiet berth could scarcely have been made; and when we came to take a glance at the trim and taut-looking vessel, we felt inclined to wonder, as with the fly in amber, "how the deuce she got there?” Southwest Harbor is about twenty-three miles from Ellsworth, Maine. To reach it, recalls those tortuous times when our forefathers ventured forth at rare intervals, their wills made, their flasks full, and their powder dry. The journey from New York to Boston, and from thence to Bangor, savors of the nineteenth century, but from Bangor to Ellsworth, and from Ellsworth to Southwest Harbor, speaks loudly of the eighteenth."
Description:
Harry Alexander Ogden's famous drawing of the S.S. Cambria. The article begins: "In the landlocked waters of Southwest Harbor lies the now muchly talked of Cambria. A more adroit selection for a quiet berth could scarcely have been made; and when we came to take a glance at the trim and taut-looking vessel, we felt inclined to wonder, as with the fly in amber, "how the deuce she got there?” Southwest Harbor is about twenty-three miles from Ellsworth, Maine. To reach it, recalls those tortuous times when our forefathers ventured forth at rare intervals, their wills made, their flasks full, and their powder dry. The journey from New York to Boston, and from thence to Bangor, savors of the nineteenth century, but from Bangor to Ellsworth, and from Ellsworth to Southwest Harbor, speaks loudly of the eighteenth." [show more]
7804WWI S.S. America Troop Billet Ticket
  • Object, Ticket, Transportation Ticket
  • Vessels, Ship
  • 1919-04
The troop billet ticket of Private Andrew Harmon Herrick. "Whenever you feel like growling, go out on deck, take ten deep breaths and smile for five minutes. The war is all over!" - U.S.S. America Troop Billet Ticket S.S. America, an Italian liner, was built for Navigazione Generale Italiana in 1908 by Cantieri Nav. Riuniti, Muggiano, Italy. Tonnage: 8,996. Dimensions: 476' x 55'. Twin screw, 16 1/2 knots. Triple expansion engines. Two masts and two funnels. She was originally owned and operated by La Veloce Line, making her maiden voyage Genoa to New York, May 20, 1909. She transported American troops during World War I, was in South American service, from 1924 and was scrapped in 1928.
Description:
The troop billet ticket of Private Andrew Harmon Herrick. "Whenever you feel like growling, go out on deck, take ten deep breaths and smile for five minutes. The war is all over!" - U.S.S. America Troop Billet Ticket S.S. America, an Italian liner, was built for Navigazione Generale Italiana in 1908 by Cantieri Nav. Riuniti, Muggiano, Italy. Tonnage: 8,996. Dimensions: 476' x 55'. Twin screw, 16 1/2 knots. Triple expansion engines. Two masts and two funnels. She was originally owned and operated by La Veloce Line, making her maiden voyage Genoa to New York, May 20, 1909. She transported American troops during World War I, was in South American service, from 1924 and was scrapped in 1928. [show more]
16064War “Ships” in Harbor, Bar Harbor, ME
  • Image, Photograph, Picture Postcard
  • Vessels, Ship
  • The Hugh C. Leighton Company, Portland, Maine
  • Bar Harbor
11131Vessel in Harbor Off Mount Desert Island
  • Image, Photograph
  • Vessels, Ship
  • Southwest Harbor
15913Anthony & Josephine - Side Trawler
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Ship
3542Arthur B. Homer - Great Lakes Steam Freighter
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Ship
15884Champlain's Shallop
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Ship
Samuel de Champlain's small wooden shallop used for inshore voyages.
Description:
Samuel de Champlain's small wooden shallop used for inshore voyages.
15883Champlain's Patache
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Ship
Samuel de Champlain's small ship that he used to explore the Maine coast.
Description:
Samuel de Champlain's small ship that he used to explore the Maine coast.
15843Myra J. Wooster - Freighter
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Ship
The Myra J. Wooster “…carried salt fish to Gloucester and freight between Belfast and Bass Harbor… - Schreiber, Laurie. Boatbuilding on Mount Desert Island (Arcadia Publishing, 2016) p. 152 - from an unidentified article written by E.M Holmes in February 1947.
Description:
The Myra J. Wooster “…carried salt fish to Gloucester and freight between Belfast and Bass Harbor… - Schreiber, Laurie. Boatbuilding on Mount Desert Island (Arcadia Publishing, 2016) p. 152 - from an unidentified article written by E.M Holmes in February 1947.
15062Carrie F. Dix - Brig
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Ship
13667Aloha I - Brig Rigged Yacht
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Ship
8177Mackerel Seiner Towing a Seine Boat in Boston Harbor
  • Image, Photograph, Photographic Print, Albumen Print
  • Vessels, Ship
  • Rand - Henry Lathrop Rand (1862-1945)
  • 1891-10-03
  • Boston MA
8387View from the Wharf at Rockland
  • Image, Photograph, Photographic Print, Albumen Print
  • Vessels, Ship
  • Rand - Henry Lathrop Rand (1862-1945)
  • 1894-08-25
  • Rockland ME
8452Brig "Venice"
  • Image, Photograph, Photographic Print, Albumen Print
  • Vessels, Ship
  • Rand - Henry Lathrop Rand (1862-1945)
  • 1895
8451Brigantines - Brig "Venice"
  • Image, Photograph, Photographic Print, Albumen Print
  • Vessels, Ship
  • Rand - Henry Lathrop Rand (1862-1945)
  • 1895
Gaff rigged and half rigged fore.
Description:
Gaff rigged and half rigged fore.
12165R.H. White's Steam Yacht Peregrine
  • Image, Photograph, Photographic Print
  • Vessels, Ship
  • Johnston - John S. Johnston
  • 1899-08-03
Bath Iron Works Report Peregrine (HULL 10) Steam Yacht for R.H. White of Boston, Mass. Length: 136' Beam: 23' Depth: 13'-11" Draft: 10' Displacement: 246 (light ship), 340.5 (full load) Other Data: 1 triple expansion steam engine, 500 horsepower, steel hull. Keel laid September 28,1895, launched January 2,1896, delivered April 28,1896.
Description:
Bath Iron Works Report Peregrine (HULL 10) Steam Yacht for R.H. White of Boston, Mass. Length: 136' Beam: 23' Depth: 13'-11" Draft: 10' Displacement: 246 (light ship), 340.5 (full load) Other Data: 1 triple expansion steam engine, 500 horsepower, steel hull. Keel laid September 28,1895, launched January 2,1896, delivered April 28,1896.
5458Vessel Enterprise at Gloucester
  • Image, Photograph, Photographic Print, Albumen Print
  • Places, Harbor
  • Vessels, Ship
  • Rand - Henry Lathrop Rand (1862-1945)
  • 1895
  • Gloucester MA
7051Cape Elizabeth Lightship
  • Image, Photograph, Picture Postcard, Real Photo
  • Vessels, Ship
Portland, Me. Lightship "Cape Elizabeth" at entrance to Portland Harbor.
Description:
Portland, Me. Lightship "Cape Elizabeth" at entrance to Portland Harbor.
14253Rambler - Pleasure Boat
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Ship
Tom Reath's 1st boat 30'
Description:
Tom Reath's 1st boat 30'
14235Placida - Motor Yacht
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Ship
“Placida” was designed by the Henry J. Gielow Company and built by Bath Iron Works. She was one of five diesel-powered sister ships, built on speculation, and essentially to the same design, by the Bath Iron Works in the early Thirties, among them, “Placida,” “Sylvia” and Kenkora II. The over-all length of each ship was slightly more than 190 feet, with a displacement of 396 tons. “The Placida had two launch tenders. The starboard launch was the one usually used to take members of the owner's party (guests etc.) to and from shore facilities such as the Clifton Dock in Northeast Harbor or any other place where the yacht was unable to tie up to a pier. The port launch was used to take the crew ashore and bring supplies on board when needed. The port launch could also be used when the starboard launch needed engine repairs since the two launches were the same size. The starboard launch is the one used as the Northeast Harbor Fleet race committee boat. The race committee started boat races and recorded how they finished. This went on for a year or two immediately following World War II. I do not recall seeing the port launch after the War.” – Albie Neilson 09/12/11 “Placida” was purchased by the Navy on June 19, 1941 for use during WWII and converted for Naval service at Gibbs Gas Engine Co., Jacksonville, Florida. She was commissioned as “USS Ruby” (PY-21)on September 23, 1941 and decommissioned after the war on July 23, 1945 at Boston, Massachusetts. She was struck from the Naval Register on August 13, 1945 and transferred to the Maritime Commission for disposal on December 26, December 1945. The once proud yacht was scrapped in 1957. Information compiled from several sources, among them: “Ruby (PY-21)” by Gary P. Priolo, NavSource Online: Patrol Yacht Archive , 2006, Accessed online 07/31/2011; http://www.navsource.org/archives/12/1321.htm “Placida” was laid down December 23, 1929 and launched May 17, 1930. She was bought by Henry Garner Haskell Sr. and delivered to him on July 1, 1930. She was a twin screw diesel seagoing yacht, 190 feet long with a 10 foot draft. Mr. Haskell and his family cruised in her extensively from Maine to Florida with Wilmington, Delaware as her home port.
Description:
“Placida” was designed by the Henry J. Gielow Company and built by Bath Iron Works. She was one of five diesel-powered sister ships, built on speculation, and essentially to the same design, by the Bath Iron Works in the early Thirties, among them, “Placida,” “Sylvia” and Kenkora II. The over-all length of each ship was slightly more than 190 feet, with a displacement of 396 tons. “The Placida had two launch tenders. The starboard launch was the one usually used to take members of the owner's party (guests etc.) to and from shore facilities such as the Clifton Dock in Northeast Harbor or any other place where the yacht was unable to tie up to a pier. The port launch was used to take the crew ashore and bring supplies on board when needed. The port launch could also be used when the starboard launch needed engine repairs since the two launches were the same size. The starboard launch is the one used as the Northeast Harbor Fleet race committee boat. The race committee started boat races and recorded how they finished. This went on for a year or two immediately following World War II. I do not recall seeing the port launch after the War.” – Albie Neilson 09/12/11 “Placida” was purchased by the Navy on June 19, 1941 for use during WWII and converted for Naval service at Gibbs Gas Engine Co., Jacksonville, Florida. She was commissioned as “USS Ruby” (PY-21)on September 23, 1941 and decommissioned after the war on July 23, 1945 at Boston, Massachusetts. She was struck from the Naval Register on August 13, 1945 and transferred to the Maritime Commission for disposal on December 26, December 1945. The once proud yacht was scrapped in 1957. Information compiled from several sources, among them: “Ruby (PY-21)” by Gary P. Priolo, NavSource Online: Patrol Yacht Archive , 2006, Accessed online 07/31/2011; http://www.navsource.org/archives/12/1321.htm “Placida” was laid down December 23, 1929 and launched May 17, 1930. She was bought by Henry Garner Haskell Sr. and delivered to him on July 1, 1930. She was a twin screw diesel seagoing yacht, 190 feet long with a 10 foot draft. Mr. Haskell and his family cruised in her extensively from Maine to Florida with Wilmington, Delaware as her home port. [show more]
14105Raimondo Montecuccoli - Cruiser
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Ship
"Raimondo Montecuccoli" - Captain Lamberto DeLebene Condottieri-class cruiser Displacement: 7,523 t (7,404 long tons) standard 8,994 t (8,852 long tons) full load Length: 182.2 m (597 ft 9 in) Beam: 16.6 m (54 ft 6 in) Draught: 5.6 m (18 ft 4 in) Propulsion: 2 shaft Belluzzo geared turbines 6 Yarrow boilers 106,000 hp (79,044 kW) Speed: 37 knots (43 mph; 69 km/h) Carried 2 aircraft 1 catapult 47 officers 86 petty officers 318 seamen 278 midshipmen "Raimondo Montecuccoli" was a Condottieri class light cruiser serving with the Italian Regia Marina during World War II. She survived the war and served in the post-war Marina Militare until 1964. Montecuccoli, which gives the name to its own sub-class, was part of the third group of Condottieri class light cruisers. They were larger and better protected than their predecessors. She was built by Ansaldo, Genoa, and was named after Raimondo Montecuccoli, a 17th century Italian general in Austrian service. Montecuccoli entered service in 1935 and was sent out to the Far-East in 1937 to protect Italian interests during the Sino-Japanese War, and returned home in November 1938 after being relieved by the Bartolomeo Colleoni. During the war she participated in the Battle of Punta Stilo and in the successful Battle of Pantelleria, where her guns disabled the British destroyer HMS Bedouin and set the large tanker SS Kentucky on fire. She was badly damaged by USAAF bombers in Naples on 4 December 1942, but having been repaired and just weeks before the armistice, she shelled without consequences a small Allied convoy off Palermo during the Allied invasion of Sicily. After the Armistice she was interned by the Allies and returned to Italy after the war to serve as a training cruiser until 1964.
Description:
"Raimondo Montecuccoli" - Captain Lamberto DeLebene Condottieri-class cruiser Displacement: 7,523 t (7,404 long tons) standard 8,994 t (8,852 long tons) full load Length: 182.2 m (597 ft 9 in) Beam: 16.6 m (54 ft 6 in) Draught: 5.6 m (18 ft 4 in) Propulsion: 2 shaft Belluzzo geared turbines 6 Yarrow boilers 106,000 hp (79,044 kW) Speed: 37 knots (43 mph; 69 km/h) Carried 2 aircraft 1 catapult 47 officers 86 petty officers 318 seamen 278 midshipmen "Raimondo Montecuccoli" was a Condottieri class light cruiser serving with the Italian Regia Marina during World War II. She survived the war and served in the post-war Marina Militare until 1964. Montecuccoli, which gives the name to its own sub-class, was part of the third group of Condottieri class light cruisers. They were larger and better protected than their predecessors. She was built by Ansaldo, Genoa, and was named after Raimondo Montecuccoli, a 17th century Italian general in Austrian service. Montecuccoli entered service in 1935 and was sent out to the Far-East in 1937 to protect Italian interests during the Sino-Japanese War, and returned home in November 1938 after being relieved by the Bartolomeo Colleoni. During the war she participated in the Battle of Punta Stilo and in the successful Battle of Pantelleria, where her guns disabled the British destroyer HMS Bedouin and set the large tanker SS Kentucky on fire. She was badly damaged by USAAF bombers in Naples on 4 December 1942, but having been repaired and just weeks before the armistice, she shelled without consequences a small Allied convoy off Palermo during the Allied invasion of Sicily. After the Armistice she was interned by the Allies and returned to Italy after the war to serve as a training cruiser until 1964. [show more]