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14049Henry O. Underwood - Sardine Carrier
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14048Fish Hawk - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
“Fish Hawk” carries 54 hogsheads. She worked fish to factories of Jonesport through the early sixties. She broke her back when a storm drove her ashore and died at Beals Island and a dock was built over her hulk. She was built in Quincy, Massachusetts in 1914 for William Underwood Company. WC 2991, Reg #212685, 40 T Gr. X 17 Net. In 1959 she was still working out of McKinley for the William Underwood factory.” – “Sardine Carriers and Seiners of the Maine Coast” compiled and written by Paul E. Bennett, The St. Pierre Doriman, p. 28, 1992.
Description:
“Fish Hawk” carries 54 hogsheads. She worked fish to factories of Jonesport through the early sixties. She broke her back when a storm drove her ashore and died at Beals Island and a dock was built over her hulk. She was built in Quincy, Massachusetts in 1914 for William Underwood Company. WC 2991, Reg #212685, 40 T Gr. X 17 Net. In 1959 she was still working out of McKinley for the William Underwood factory.” – “Sardine Carriers and Seiners of the Maine Coast” compiled and written by Paul E. Bennett, The St. Pierre Doriman, p. 28, 1992. [show more]
14483Continental - Sardine Carrier
Attrypa - Lobster Boat
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  • Vessels, Boat, Lobster Boat
  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
Continental - Sardine Carrier
Attrypa - Lobster Boat
15099Catherine M. Butler - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
14054America - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
13959Edward M. - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
“The “Edward M.” was built in South Warren, Maine in 1940 and ran to Belfast for the Belfast Canning Company. She was later used as a freight boat. She was 58 feet long by 15 feet wide and her carrying capacity was 64 hogsheads.” - “Masts and Masters: A Brief History of Sardine Carriers and Boatmen” by John D. Gilman, published by John D. Gilman, 1993, p. 167.
Description:
“The “Edward M.” was built in South Warren, Maine in 1940 and ran to Belfast for the Belfast Canning Company. She was later used as a freight boat. She was 58 feet long by 15 feet wide and her carrying capacity was 64 hogsheads.” - “Masts and Masters: A Brief History of Sardine Carriers and Boatmen” by John D. Gilman, published by John D. Gilman, 1993, p. 167.
6522Sardine Carrier Grayling at the Underwood Wharf, McKinley, Maine
  • Image, Photograph, Photographic Print
  • Structures, Transportation, Marine Landing, Wharf
  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
  • Tremont, Bass Harbor, McKinley
14047Novelty - Sardine Carrier
Lauren T.
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
14020Hornet - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
The Hornet was a sardine carrier, dragger and seiner, built in 1944.
Description:
The Hornet was a sardine carrier, dragger and seiner, built in 1944.
15184Sea Wind - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
15119King Fisher - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
15100Medric - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
Vessel Name - Medric Class – Sardine carrier Hull - wood Masts - 2 Designed by – Build date - 1919 Built by – Hodgedon Brothers Boatyard Built at – East Boothbay, Maine Built for – Boothbay Carriers, Inc. Named for – Power - 45-horsepower gasoline engine Gross tons - 31 Net tons – 11 Capacity - 52 hogsheads herring Length – 61’ Beam – 14' Draught - Crew – Number – Disposition - at Eastport Boat School in 2012 – falling apart The “Medric” was powered with a 45-horsepower gasoline engine and was 61 feet long by 14 feet wide, carrying a load of 52 hogsheads of herring. [1 hogshead (hhd) = 17 ½ bushels or 63 U.S. gallons.] She was one of the first ‘double-ender” style of boats built on the Maine coast… After 68 years, numerous repair jobs and new engines, the “Medric” [was] still carrying herring to the Peacock plant in Lubec [Maine in 1993.] - “Masts and Masters: A Brief History of Sardine Carriers and Boatmen” by John D. Gilman, published by John D. Gilman, 1993, p. 74-75. The book lists her masters and tells more about the vessel. By 2012 Ralph Stanley reported seeing "Medric" at the Eastport boat school, falling apart.
Description:
Vessel Name - Medric Class – Sardine carrier Hull - wood Masts - 2 Designed by – Build date - 1919 Built by – Hodgedon Brothers Boatyard Built at – East Boothbay, Maine Built for – Boothbay Carriers, Inc. Named for – Power - 45-horsepower gasoline engine Gross tons - 31 Net tons – 11 Capacity - 52 hogsheads herring Length – 61’ Beam – 14' Draught - Crew – Number – Disposition - at Eastport Boat School in 2012 – falling apart The “Medric” was powered with a 45-horsepower gasoline engine and was 61 feet long by 14 feet wide, carrying a load of 52 hogsheads of herring. [1 hogshead (hhd) = 17 ½ bushels or 63 U.S. gallons.] She was one of the first ‘double-ender” style of boats built on the Maine coast… After 68 years, numerous repair jobs and new engines, the “Medric” [was] still carrying herring to the Peacock plant in Lubec [Maine in 1993.] - “Masts and Masters: A Brief History of Sardine Carriers and Boatmen” by John D. Gilman, published by John D. Gilman, 1993, p. 74-75. The book lists her masters and tells more about the vessel. By 2012 Ralph Stanley reported seeing "Medric" at the Eastport boat school, falling apart. [show more]
14831Woiee - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
“Woiee” ran for Machiasport Canning Company – “built in 1918 in Eastport, Maine. She had a registered length of 54 feet, was 15 feet wide and carried 49 hogsheads.” - “Masts and Masters: A Brief History of Sardine Carriers and Boatmen” by John D. Gilman, published by John D. Gilman, 1993, p. 179. 1 hogshead = 17½ bushels. “Sardine carrier “Woiee” was rerigged as a live aboard motor sailer with a fiberglassed hull. She is homeported at Vero Beach in Florida.” - “Sardine Carriers and Seiners of the Maine Coast” compiled and written by Paul E. Bennett, The St. Pierre Doriman, p. Ja, 1992.
Description:
“Woiee” ran for Machiasport Canning Company – “built in 1918 in Eastport, Maine. She had a registered length of 54 feet, was 15 feet wide and carried 49 hogsheads.” - “Masts and Masters: A Brief History of Sardine Carriers and Boatmen” by John D. Gilman, published by John D. Gilman, 1993, p. 179. 1 hogshead = 17½ bushels. “Sardine carrier “Woiee” was rerigged as a live aboard motor sailer with a fiberglassed hull. She is homeported at Vero Beach in Florida.” - “Sardine Carriers and Seiners of the Maine Coast” compiled and written by Paul E. Bennett, The St. Pierre Doriman, p. Ja, 1992. [show more]
14185Surfman - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
14061Bessie L. - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
Sardine carrier “Bessey L.” 36 hogsheads, 51’4” x 14’5” x 6’2” deep. She was built in 1905 at Lubec for Riviera Packing, Eastport, 27 GR T., 16 T NET. Call letters WC4221, Reg. #202066. She boated fish to the Holmes factories and in the late ‘40’s she worked herrin’ to the Maine Sardine Co. of Addison. She has been slowly dying in the Creek at Jonesport, Maine, since Skipper Adien Smith limped her in with a broken piston in April of 1973. She boated herrin’ for the Holmes factories at Robbinston and Eastport most of her life until the winter of ’72-’73 when she was rigged up for dragging scallops. When she was working the herrin’ she could carry 56 hogsheads… “Sardine Carriers and Seiners of the Maine Coast” compiled and written by Paul E. Bennett, The St. Pierre Doriman, p. 8, 12, 1992.
Description:
Sardine carrier “Bessey L.” 36 hogsheads, 51’4” x 14’5” x 6’2” deep. She was built in 1905 at Lubec for Riviera Packing, Eastport, 27 GR T., 16 T NET. Call letters WC4221, Reg. #202066. She boated fish to the Holmes factories and in the late ‘40’s she worked herrin’ to the Maine Sardine Co. of Addison. She has been slowly dying in the Creek at Jonesport, Maine, since Skipper Adien Smith limped her in with a broken piston in April of 1973. She boated herrin’ for the Holmes factories at Robbinston and Eastport most of her life until the winter of ’72-’73 when she was rigged up for dragging scallops. When she was working the herrin’ she could carry 56 hogsheads… “Sardine Carriers and Seiners of the Maine Coast” compiled and written by Paul E. Bennett, The St. Pierre Doriman, p. 8, 12, 1992. [show more]
14040Joyce Marie - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
“The “Joyce Marie” (formerly named “Glen Gary”) was built in 1948 in Thomaston, Maine. She was a round-sterned, 80 foot sardine carrier that would carry 75 hogsheads of fish. [1 hogshead (hhd) = 17 ½ bushels or 63 U.S. gallons.] The “Joyce Marie” carried fish to North Lubec Manufacturing and Can Company in Rockland, Maine fir a time and then to various Stinson Canning Company factories …Charlton Dow and his son Gregory, of Bass Harbor ran the “Joyce Marie” until it was decided that she was no longer seaworthy and was tied up and left to die… …[After 1989] she was taken out of retirement and put back to work.” - “Masts and Masters: A Brief History of Sardine Carriers and Boatmen” by John D. Gilman, published by John D. Gilman, 1993, p. 99-100. “Captain Dave Bikford has [“Joyce Marie”] now. L.O.A. 80’, LWL 69’ x 18’ x 8’6”. Built 1948 Thomaston, Maine and launched as “Glengary.” She can boat 1359 bu. Decks are white pine on oak beams and she has a 10” x 10” keelson. Official #256967, 51 Gr. T. x 40 T. net. At one time she boated fish to Addison Packing in S.W. Harbor. Skippered by Donald Stuart of Richardson, Deer Island.” - Sardine Carriers and Seiners of the Maine Coast compiled and written by Paul E. Bennett, The St. Pierre Doriman, p. 21 & 28 – 1992. For beautiful photographs of “Joyce Marie” see “Wood, Water & Light: Classic Wooden Boats,” Text by Joel White and Photographs by Benjamin Mendlowitz, published by W.W. Norton & Company, 1988, p. 139-141.
Description:
“The “Joyce Marie” (formerly named “Glen Gary”) was built in 1948 in Thomaston, Maine. She was a round-sterned, 80 foot sardine carrier that would carry 75 hogsheads of fish. [1 hogshead (hhd) = 17 ½ bushels or 63 U.S. gallons.] The “Joyce Marie” carried fish to North Lubec Manufacturing and Can Company in Rockland, Maine fir a time and then to various Stinson Canning Company factories …Charlton Dow and his son Gregory, of Bass Harbor ran the “Joyce Marie” until it was decided that she was no longer seaworthy and was tied up and left to die… …[After 1989] she was taken out of retirement and put back to work.” - “Masts and Masters: A Brief History of Sardine Carriers and Boatmen” by John D. Gilman, published by John D. Gilman, 1993, p. 99-100. “Captain Dave Bikford has [“Joyce Marie”] now. L.O.A. 80’, LWL 69’ x 18’ x 8’6”. Built 1948 Thomaston, Maine and launched as “Glengary.” She can boat 1359 bu. Decks are white pine on oak beams and she has a 10” x 10” keelson. Official #256967, 51 Gr. T. x 40 T. net. At one time she boated fish to Addison Packing in S.W. Harbor. Skippered by Donald Stuart of Richardson, Deer Island.” - Sardine Carriers and Seiners of the Maine Coast compiled and written by Paul E. Bennett, The St. Pierre Doriman, p. 21 & 28 – 1992. For beautiful photographs of “Joyce Marie” see “Wood, Water & Light: Classic Wooden Boats,” Text by Joel White and Photographs by Benjamin Mendlowitz, published by W.W. Norton & Company, 1988, p. 139-141. [show more]
14045Roamer - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
“Built to E. Boothbay 1924 for William Underwood, Jonesport. She measured up 39 T. Gr. x 17 Net and was 61’ x 15’3” x 7’6”, She would carry 52 hhds to the W. Jonesport factory and Ernest Wolf who lived there in W. Jonesport had her a while and then Lewis Beal took her. She ran herrin’ to the Bass Harbor factory on occasions.” - Sardine Carriers and Seiners of the Maine Coast compiled and written by Paul E. Bennett, The St. Pierre Doriman, p. 54 – 1992
Description:
“Built to E. Boothbay 1924 for William Underwood, Jonesport. She measured up 39 T. Gr. x 17 Net and was 61’ x 15’3” x 7’6”, She would carry 52 hhds to the W. Jonesport factory and Ernest Wolf who lived there in W. Jonesport had her a while and then Lewis Beal took her. She ran herrin’ to the Bass Harbor factory on occasions.” - Sardine Carriers and Seiners of the Maine Coast compiled and written by Paul E. Bennett, The St. Pierre Doriman, p. 54 – 1992 [show more]
14046Christopher - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
“Sardine carrier “Christopher” 37 hogsheads, boated for Ralph K. Barter in Stonington. She was built in 1888 in Brewer, Maine, 43’4” x 11’2” x 4’5”, 13 T GR and 9 T Net, reg. #126524, call letters WA3686. At one time she had a 30 HP oil bullgine.” – “Sardine Carriers and Seiners of the Maine Coast” compiled and written by Paul E. Bennett, The St. Pierre Doriman, p. 28, 1992.
Description:
“Sardine carrier “Christopher” 37 hogsheads, boated for Ralph K. Barter in Stonington. She was built in 1888 in Brewer, Maine, 43’4” x 11’2” x 4’5”, 13 T GR and 9 T Net, reg. #126524, call letters WA3686. At one time she had a 30 HP oil bullgine.” – “Sardine Carriers and Seiners of the Maine Coast” compiled and written by Paul E. Bennett, The St. Pierre Doriman, p. 28, 1992.
14050Glenn Geary - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
14051Helen McColl - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
The “Helen McColl” was named for the daughter of the Seacoast Canning Company manager, Francis P. McColl. “The vessel “Helen McColl” “was often referred to as the “Queen” or “Flagship” of the Seacoast [Canning Company] fleet. She had fine lines, was long and narrow with two masts and no wheelhouse.” She was similar to the “Mildred McColl” built in 1913 and named for Helen’s mother, Mary Permelia “Mildred” (Smith) McColl. She was originally built [in 1911 by the Adams Ship Building Company at East Boothbay, Maine as a “knock about” schooner to be used to freight lobsters from Nova Scotia to Boston… She was 65 feet, seven inches long on the keel and 16 feet, six inches wide and built with natural-growth timbers. She was powered with an auxiliary engine and sails on her two masts. In 1912 she had work done to her in Lepreau, N.B. …In 1954, the Seaboard Packing Co. was sold to Stinson Canning Co. and they took over ownership of the “Helen McColl.” Her new Master was Kermit Thurston and he ran fish to Stinson’s factories in South West Harbor, Bath and Prospect Harbor, Maine.” - “Masts and Masters: A Brief History of Sardine Carriers and Boatmen” by John D. Gilman, published by John D. Gilman, 1993, p. 60-63. See the book for an extensive history of the McColl’s seagoing life and masters. “1911, 65’7” x 16’5” x 6’6” at East Boothbay for Seabord Packing Co. of Eastport. 36 Gross x 17 Net, call WAS757, No. 208535. Some of the skippers who worked her were Liscomb Hartford, Sumner Hartford, Ott Cline, Ned Hallett, Hal Grew, Sam Herley, Art Sirles, Heber McNeil. Arnie Cline in summer of 1918 ran her with Somerville Anderson. It has been recorded that the three master “Lillian E. Kerr,” the lumber schooner out of Machias, was towed through Lubec Narrow to a safe anchorage in Johnson’s Bay by the “McCall,” ahead of a bad spell of weather. In the middle 1960’s she was running fish to Bath. In the old days she made occasional pleasure trips across to N.S. to the Annapolis Valley cherry picking rinktums and shin digs. She was sold to Pacific Northwest.” - Sardine Carriers and Seiners of the Maine Coast compiled and written by Paul E. Bennett, The St. Pierre Doriman, p. 31 – 1992 with additions from “Canned: A History of the Sardine Industry,” Part II, by John Gilman, privately published, September 2003, p. 30.
Description:
The “Helen McColl” was named for the daughter of the Seacoast Canning Company manager, Francis P. McColl. “The vessel “Helen McColl” “was often referred to as the “Queen” or “Flagship” of the Seacoast [Canning Company] fleet. She had fine lines, was long and narrow with two masts and no wheelhouse.” She was similar to the “Mildred McColl” built in 1913 and named for Helen’s mother, Mary Permelia “Mildred” (Smith) McColl. She was originally built [in 1911 by the Adams Ship Building Company at East Boothbay, Maine as a “knock about” schooner to be used to freight lobsters from Nova Scotia to Boston… She was 65 feet, seven inches long on the keel and 16 feet, six inches wide and built with natural-growth timbers. She was powered with an auxiliary engine and sails on her two masts. In 1912 she had work done to her in Lepreau, N.B. …In 1954, the Seaboard Packing Co. was sold to Stinson Canning Co. and they took over ownership of the “Helen McColl.” Her new Master was Kermit Thurston and he ran fish to Stinson’s factories in South West Harbor, Bath and Prospect Harbor, Maine.” - “Masts and Masters: A Brief History of Sardine Carriers and Boatmen” by John D. Gilman, published by John D. Gilman, 1993, p. 60-63. See the book for an extensive history of the McColl’s seagoing life and masters. “1911, 65’7” x 16’5” x 6’6” at East Boothbay for Seabord Packing Co. of Eastport. 36 Gross x 17 Net, call WAS757, No. 208535. Some of the skippers who worked her were Liscomb Hartford, Sumner Hartford, Ott Cline, Ned Hallett, Hal Grew, Sam Herley, Art Sirles, Heber McNeil. Arnie Cline in summer of 1918 ran her with Somerville Anderson. It has been recorded that the three master “Lillian E. Kerr,” the lumber schooner out of Machias, was towed through Lubec Narrow to a safe anchorage in Johnson’s Bay by the “McCall,” ahead of a bad spell of weather. In the middle 1960’s she was running fish to Bath. In the old days she made occasional pleasure trips across to N.S. to the Annapolis Valley cherry picking rinktums and shin digs. She was sold to Pacific Northwest.” - Sardine Carriers and Seiners of the Maine Coast compiled and written by Paul E. Bennett, The St. Pierre Doriman, p. 31 – 1992 with additions from “Canned: A History of the Sardine Industry,” Part II, by John Gilman, privately published, September 2003, p. 30. [show more]
14039Jacob Pike - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
14008Gary Alan - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
"Gary Alan," a sardine carrier. was built by Grandville W. Davis for L. Ray of Jonesport. "Gary Alan" built at “McKinley, Maine, 1950 (Bass Harbor) for L. Ray, Jonesport. 52’4” x 15’ x 7’2”, 29 Gr. T x 13 Net, Reg #261486. Ernest Beal was her skipper for years. When I saw her in her boathouse October 3, 1990 at the L.Ray plant in Millbridge, she was all painted up and ready to be let down the ways and go to work. At that Pete Sawyer told me they were getting the herrin’ trucked in from Lubec pumping station. When I visited the L. Ray Sardine factory in Millbridge October 22, 1991 she was still in the boathouse beside the factory and still for sale. She was built as a sister ship of the “Lawrence Wayne” by Sim Davis of Frenchboro Harbor.” - "Sardine Carriers and Seiners of the Maine Coast" compiled and written by Paul E. Bennett, The St. Pierre Doriman, p. 28 – 1992
Description:
"Gary Alan," a sardine carrier. was built by Grandville W. Davis for L. Ray of Jonesport. "Gary Alan" built at “McKinley, Maine, 1950 (Bass Harbor) for L. Ray, Jonesport. 52’4” x 15’ x 7’2”, 29 Gr. T x 13 Net, Reg #261486. Ernest Beal was her skipper for years. When I saw her in her boathouse October 3, 1990 at the L.Ray plant in Millbridge, she was all painted up and ready to be let down the ways and go to work. At that Pete Sawyer told me they were getting the herrin’ trucked in from Lubec pumping station. When I visited the L. Ray Sardine factory in Millbridge October 22, 1991 she was still in the boathouse beside the factory and still for sale. She was built as a sister ship of the “Lawrence Wayne” by Sim Davis of Frenchboro Harbor.” - "Sardine Carriers and Seiners of the Maine Coast" compiled and written by Paul E. Bennett, The St. Pierre Doriman, p. 28 – 1992 [show more]
14010Lady Lurene - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
13956Eva Grace - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
“Eva Grace” ran for the Stinson Canning Company. “…built in 1930 in East Machias, Maine. Registered as 60 feet long and 15 feet wide.” - “Masts and Masters: A Brief History of Sardine Carriers and Boatmen” by John D. Gilman, published by John D. Gilman, 1993, p. 181.
Description:
“Eva Grace” ran for the Stinson Canning Company. “…built in 1930 in East Machias, Maine. Registered as 60 feet long and 15 feet wide.” - “Masts and Masters: A Brief History of Sardine Carriers and Boatmen” by John D. Gilman, published by John D. Gilman, 1993, p. 181.
13960Lou Ann - Sardine Carrier
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  • Vessels, Boat, Sardine Carrier
“The “Lou Ann” was built in 1947 in Thomaston, Maine to be used as a sardine carrier. She was 85 feet long, had a round stern and would carry 101 hogsheads of herring. [1 hogshead (hhd) = 17 ½ bushels or 63 U.S. gallons.] She was built to carry herring to the Stinson Canning Company in Bath, Maine. The “Lou Ann” was rebuilt at Robin Hood Marina near Boothbay and converted into a purse-seiner. Her pilot house was moved forward to make more room down aft for the seine. …[She] was [later]re-converted to a sardine carrier … She now carries 75 hogsheads of herring and was still in use until the 1991 season… Early in the 1991 season, the “Lou Ann” was on her way to the factory at Prospect Harbour with fish aboard when she was steered to the wrong side of the buoy and struck a ledge. [She] sank in 75 feet of water and was later floated and towed to shore to assess the damage. It was decided that she would be put up for sale by tender “as is, where is,” on the beach at Prospect Harbour. She was sold and was rebuilt to work in the windjammer trade.” - “Masts and Masters: A Brief History of Sardine Carriers and Boatmen” by John D. Gilman, published by John D. Gilman, 1993, p. 100-101. She is 68’LWL x 17’6” x 8’4” with call letters of WC3444 and is #253584. An October 27, 1989 survey states that a fake funnel serves as access to her engine room. She has hard pine planking on 4” sided sawn frames x 6” at the keelson with white pine decking. She has a double hold, one measuring 46 hogsheads and the other measuring 56. “Lou Ann” struck the Old Woman Ledge just east of the R”2” GONG off Bunker Harbor on the east side of Schoodic at 3:30 am in black tick o’ fog on Sunday, July7, 1991 on her way from Seal Island towards the Stinson factory at Prospect Harbor. She had a belly full of herrin’ when she hit the ledge. He under water was hurt badly and she was hauled at Hinckley in Manset while her new owner Capt. Pagel re-built her into a 2-master as a sister ship to the schooner “Nathaniel Bowditch”. - “Sardine Carriers and Seiners of the Maine Coast” compiled and written by Paul E. Bennett, The St. Pierre Doriman, p. 25, 1992.
Description:
“The “Lou Ann” was built in 1947 in Thomaston, Maine to be used as a sardine carrier. She was 85 feet long, had a round stern and would carry 101 hogsheads of herring. [1 hogshead (hhd) = 17 ½ bushels or 63 U.S. gallons.] She was built to carry herring to the Stinson Canning Company in Bath, Maine. The “Lou Ann” was rebuilt at Robin Hood Marina near Boothbay and converted into a purse-seiner. Her pilot house was moved forward to make more room down aft for the seine. …[She] was [later]re-converted to a sardine carrier … She now carries 75 hogsheads of herring and was still in use until the 1991 season… Early in the 1991 season, the “Lou Ann” was on her way to the factory at Prospect Harbour with fish aboard when she was steered to the wrong side of the buoy and struck a ledge. [She] sank in 75 feet of water and was later floated and towed to shore to assess the damage. It was decided that she would be put up for sale by tender “as is, where is,” on the beach at Prospect Harbour. She was sold and was rebuilt to work in the windjammer trade.” - “Masts and Masters: A Brief History of Sardine Carriers and Boatmen” by John D. Gilman, published by John D. Gilman, 1993, p. 100-101. She is 68’LWL x 17’6” x 8’4” with call letters of WC3444 and is #253584. An October 27, 1989 survey states that a fake funnel serves as access to her engine room. She has hard pine planking on 4” sided sawn frames x 6” at the keelson with white pine decking. She has a double hold, one measuring 46 hogsheads and the other measuring 56. “Lou Ann” struck the Old Woman Ledge just east of the R”2” GONG off Bunker Harbor on the east side of Schoodic at 3:30 am in black tick o’ fog on Sunday, July7, 1991 on her way from Seal Island towards the Stinson factory at Prospect Harbor. She had a belly full of herrin’ when she hit the ledge. He under water was hurt badly and she was hauled at Hinckley in Manset while her new owner Capt. Pagel re-built her into a 2-master as a sister ship to the schooner “Nathaniel Bowditch”. - “Sardine Carriers and Seiners of the Maine Coast” compiled and written by Paul E. Bennett, The St. Pierre Doriman, p. 25, 1992. [show more]