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Item Title Type Subject Creator Publisher Date Place Address Description
15847Sunshine - Sloop Yacht
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
15837Cyndy - Auxiliary Sloop
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
15836Circumstance - Sloop
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
15831Bobill II - Sloop
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
12223Ralph Stanley - Half-Model - Sloop
  • Image, Photograph
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
  • Stanley - Ralph Warren Stanley (1929-)
  • 2013-07-27
  • Southwest Harbor
Half model of a sloop - boat never built. Ralph said, "I just wanted to make a half model." Built circa 1960. Photographs by Charlotte Helen (Riebel) Morrill.
Description:
Half model of a sloop - boat never built. Ralph said, "I just wanted to make a half model." Built circa 1960. Photographs by Charlotte Helen (Riebel) Morrill.
5355Maine Sloop Boats Gwenn and Fearless Underway in Southwest Harbor
  • Image, Photograph, Photographic Print, Albumen Print
  • Places, Harbor
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
  • Rand - Henry Lathrop Rand (1862-1945)
  • 1891-08-20
14534Alert - Sloop
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
8172Sloop Yacht in Boston Harbor
  • Image, Photograph, Photographic Print, Albumen Print
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
  • Rand - Henry Lathrop Rand (1862-1945)
  • 1891-09-26
  • Boston MA
6528William Billy H. Webster's Maine Sloop Boat
  • Image, Photograph
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
5702"The St. Marys Boys Sailing"
  • Image, Photograph, Photographic Print, Albumen Print
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
  • Rand - Henry Lathrop Rand (1862-1945)
  • 1890-08
N.Y.N. SS "St. Marys" - The New York Nautical School Ship "St. Mary's" Vessel Name – USS St. Marys Class – sloop of war Hull - wood Masts - 3 Carried – 16 - 32 pound cannons, 6 - 8” guns Designed by – Build date - 1844 Built by – Built at – U.S. Naval Yard, Washington, D.C. Built for – U.S. Navy Named for – the first colonial settlement in Maryland Displacement 958 tons Gross tons - 766 Length – 149’3” Beam – 37'4" Draught - 18' Sail area – Crew – 195 Number – Disposition - Laid up at Mare Island September 1866 Recommissioned fall of 1870 Placed in ordinary at Norfolk, VA., 3 June 1873 Transferred to the Public Marine School at New York in 1875 - served as school ship until June 1908 Final Disposition - sold for scrapping in August 1908 to Thomas Butler and Co., Boston November 1908 - dismasted and dismantled hull burned at Point of Pines, Massachusetts, for the purpose of getting the copper that was in her.
Description:
N.Y.N. SS "St. Marys" - The New York Nautical School Ship "St. Mary's" Vessel Name – USS St. Marys Class – sloop of war Hull - wood Masts - 3 Carried – 16 - 32 pound cannons, 6 - 8” guns Designed by – Build date - 1844 Built by – Built at – U.S. Naval Yard, Washington, D.C. Built for – U.S. Navy Named for – the first colonial settlement in Maryland Displacement 958 tons Gross tons - 766 Length – 149’3” Beam – 37'4" Draught - 18' Sail area – Crew – 195 Number – Disposition - Laid up at Mare Island September 1866 Recommissioned fall of 1870 Placed in ordinary at Norfolk, VA., 3 June 1873 Transferred to the Public Marine School at New York in 1875 - served as school ship until June 1908 Final Disposition - sold for scrapping in August 1908 to Thomas Butler and Co., Boston November 1908 - dismasted and dismantled hull burned at Point of Pines, Massachusetts, for the purpose of getting the copper that was in her. [show more]
11660Ralph and Richard Stanley Loading Stones for Ballast in Friendship Sloop Endeavor
  • Image, Photograph
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
  • Milner - Craig Milner
  • 1979
15411Gelouba - Custom 41’ Cutter
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
15132Hinckley Islander Sloop
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
"The first volume production of auxiliary sailboats was the 'Islander' sloop designed by Sparkman & Stephens. Twenty of these were built between 1938 and 1940. The first were 29 feet overall and the last were redesigned bo 31 feet overall." -- The Hinckley Story (p. 25).
Description:
"The first volume production of auxiliary sailboats was the 'Islander' sloop designed by Sparkman & Stephens. Twenty of these were built between 1938 and 1940. The first were 29 feet overall and the last were redesigned bo 31 feet overall." -- The Hinckley Story (p. 25).
15163St. Mary's - Sloop
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
N.Y.N. SS "St. Marys" - The New York Nautical School Ship "St. Mary's" Vessel Name – USS St. Marys Class – sloop of war Hull - wood Masts - 3 Carried – 16 - 32 pound cannons, 6 - 8” guns Designed by – Build date - 1844 Built by – Built at – U.S. Naval Yard, Washington, D.C. Built for – U.S. Navy Named for – the first colonial settlement in Maryland Displacement 958 tons Gross tons - 766 Length – 149’3” Beam – 37'4" Draught - 18' Sail area – Crew – 195 Number – Disposition - Laid up at Mare Island September 1866 Recommissioned fall of 1870 Placed in ordinary at Norfolk, VA., 3 June 1873 Transferred to the Public Marine School at New York in 1875 - served as school ship until June 1908 Final Disposition - sold for scrapping in August 1908 to Thomas Butler and Co., Boston November 1908 - dismasted and dismantled hull burned at Point of Pines, Massachusetts, for the purpose of getting the copper that was in her. "Southwest Harbor, Me., August 7 - The schoolship St. Mary's arrived at this place to-day, twenty-four days from Madeira. All on board are well. The vessel is commanded by Commander A.S. Crowninshield, United States Navy." - The New York Times, August 8, 1890. Arent Schuyler Crowninshield (March 14, 1843-May 27, 1908) was a Rear Admiral of the United States Navy. He saw combat during the Civil War, and after the war held high commands both afloat and ashore. Born in New York, he was the grandson of Jacob Crowninshield (appointed Navy secretary under Jefferson but who died before taking up the office), and grandnephew of George Crowninshield (adventuring owner of Cleopatra's Barge, first yacht to cross the Atlantic). Arent graduated from the United States Naval Academy on May 28, 1863 and immediately went into action in the American Civil War, participating in the assault on Fort Fisher while serving on the steam sloop Ticonderoga. After the war, he rose steadily through the ranks, becoming Lieutenant in 1866, Commander in 1880, where he was from 1887 to 1891 commander of the school ship St. Mary. Promoted Captain on July 21, 1894, he took command of the new battleship Maine at her commissioning in 1895, leaving in 1897 to become chief of the Bureau of Navigation. - Arlington National Cemetery In 1886 Commander Crowninshield, U.S.N. and family of Washington, D.C. were listed as spending the summer at “The Anchorage” in Seal Harbor. "USS St. Marys (1875-1908) - A sloop of War built in 1844, USS St. Marys served in the Pacific Fleet during the Civil War and made some patrols against the slave trade. She was assigned to the City of New York as a training ship to the newly formed New York Nautical School by the Secretary of the Navy by Act of Congress. After thirty-three years of service, the longest of all the training ships, she was retired." - http://www.maritimeindustrymuseum.org/ships.htm - Accessed 2007. "USS St. Mary's - 1875-1908 - The Original USS St. Mary’s, built in the Washington, D.C. Navy Yard in 1844, was named for the first colonial settlement in Maryland. She was 149 feet, 3 inches in length and had a tonnage of 766 and an original battery of twenty guns. Her main truck towered 150 feet above the spar deck. Following her commissioning as a naval vessel in 1844, she cruised with the Home Squadron and saw active service in the Mexican War taking part in the capture of Tampico in 1846 and later brought home trophies captured during the Mexican campaign. From 1848 to 1873, the St. Mary’s was attached to the Pacific and Asiatic Squadrons, and in 1860, her sailors and marines cooperated with the forces aboard H.B.M.S. Clio, in quelling insurrections at Panama. In 1873, upon arrival at Norfolk, Virginia the vessel was laid up in ordinary. The St. Mary’s was one of the fastest sailing ships of her time. She was one of the ships in Admiral Perry’s fleet which opened up Japan in 1850 and was a sister ship of the USS Saratoga which also took part in that historic voyage to the Japanese Empire. The St Mary’s was commissioned as the training ship for the New York Nautical School in 1874 and served in this capacity until February, 1908. On November 14th of that year, the dismasted and dismantled hull was burned at Point of Pines, Massachusetts, for the purpose of getting the copper that was in her. Her history closely parallels that of the USS Saratoga which ended her active service about the same time after a colorful career. The Forty-five ensign that flew at the gaff of the old St. Mary’s when she was decommissioned in 1908 is on display in the Museum. This very flag was flown by second USS St. Mary’s in Tokyo during the Japanese surrender. The Second USS St. Mary’s, under the command of Captain E. R. Glosten, class of 1908, and took an honored place in the hard hitting forces of Admiral Nimitz." - Maritime College, State University of New York web site, http://www.sunymaritime.edu/Maritime%20Museum/TrainingShipWing/stmarys.aspx, Accessed 2007. "...1903 graduate of the New York Nautical School, the institution out of which eventually emerged present day Maritime College. In that period, the School for all intents and purposes was conducted primarily aboard the St. Mary's, and it was on this ship that students eventually would sail to foreign ports." - The Frederick M. Hendrickson Class Of 1903 Student Papers by Nicholas J. Falco, Archivist, January 1999 - Deposited at the Archive/Maritime Historical Records Collection, Stephen B. Luce Library, SUNY Maritime College.
Description:
N.Y.N. SS "St. Marys" - The New York Nautical School Ship "St. Mary's" Vessel Name – USS St. Marys Class – sloop of war Hull - wood Masts - 3 Carried – 16 - 32 pound cannons, 6 - 8” guns Designed by – Build date - 1844 Built by – Built at – U.S. Naval Yard, Washington, D.C. Built for – U.S. Navy Named for – the first colonial settlement in Maryland Displacement 958 tons Gross tons - 766 Length – 149’3” Beam – 37'4" Draught - 18' Sail area – Crew – 195 Number – Disposition - Laid up at Mare Island September 1866 Recommissioned fall of 1870 Placed in ordinary at Norfolk, VA., 3 June 1873 Transferred to the Public Marine School at New York in 1875 - served as school ship until June 1908 Final Disposition - sold for scrapping in August 1908 to Thomas Butler and Co., Boston November 1908 - dismasted and dismantled hull burned at Point of Pines, Massachusetts, for the purpose of getting the copper that was in her. "Southwest Harbor, Me., August 7 - The schoolship St. Mary's arrived at this place to-day, twenty-four days from Madeira. All on board are well. The vessel is commanded by Commander A.S. Crowninshield, United States Navy." - The New York Times, August 8, 1890. Arent Schuyler Crowninshield (March 14, 1843-May 27, 1908) was a Rear Admiral of the United States Navy. He saw combat during the Civil War, and after the war held high commands both afloat and ashore. Born in New York, he was the grandson of Jacob Crowninshield (appointed Navy secretary under Jefferson but who died before taking up the office), and grandnephew of George Crowninshield (adventuring owner of Cleopatra's Barge, first yacht to cross the Atlantic). Arent graduated from the United States Naval Academy on May 28, 1863 and immediately went into action in the American Civil War, participating in the assault on Fort Fisher while serving on the steam sloop Ticonderoga. After the war, he rose steadily through the ranks, becoming Lieutenant in 1866, Commander in 1880, where he was from 1887 to 1891 commander of the school ship St. Mary. Promoted Captain on July 21, 1894, he took command of the new battleship Maine at her commissioning in 1895, leaving in 1897 to become chief of the Bureau of Navigation. - Arlington National Cemetery In 1886 Commander Crowninshield, U.S.N. and family of Washington, D.C. were listed as spending the summer at “The Anchorage” in Seal Harbor. "USS St. Marys (1875-1908) - A sloop of War built in 1844, USS St. Marys served in the Pacific Fleet during the Civil War and made some patrols against the slave trade. She was assigned to the City of New York as a training ship to the newly formed New York Nautical School by the Secretary of the Navy by Act of Congress. After thirty-three years of service, the longest of all the training ships, she was retired." - http://www.maritimeindustrymuseum.org/ships.htm - Accessed 2007. "USS St. Mary's - 1875-1908 - The Original USS St. Mary’s, built in the Washington, D.C. Navy Yard in 1844, was named for the first colonial settlement in Maryland. She was 149 feet, 3 inches in length and had a tonnage of 766 and an original battery of twenty guns. Her main truck towered 150 feet above the spar deck. Following her commissioning as a naval vessel in 1844, she cruised with the Home Squadron and saw active service in the Mexican War taking part in the capture of Tampico in 1846 and later brought home trophies captured during the Mexican campaign. From 1848 to 1873, the St. Mary’s was attached to the Pacific and Asiatic Squadrons, and in 1860, her sailors and marines cooperated with the forces aboard H.B.M.S. Clio, in quelling insurrections at Panama. In 1873, upon arrival at Norfolk, Virginia the vessel was laid up in ordinary. The St. Mary’s was one of the fastest sailing ships of her time. She was one of the ships in Admiral Perry’s fleet which opened up Japan in 1850 and was a sister ship of the USS Saratoga which also took part in that historic voyage to the Japanese Empire. The St Mary’s was commissioned as the training ship for the New York Nautical School in 1874 and served in this capacity until February, 1908. On November 14th of that year, the dismasted and dismantled hull was burned at Point of Pines, Massachusetts, for the purpose of getting the copper that was in her. Her history closely parallels that of the USS Saratoga which ended her active service about the same time after a colorful career. The Forty-five ensign that flew at the gaff of the old St. Mary’s when she was decommissioned in 1908 is on display in the Museum. This very flag was flown by second USS St. Mary’s in Tokyo during the Japanese surrender. The Second USS St. Mary’s, under the command of Captain E. R. Glosten, class of 1908, and took an honored place in the hard hitting forces of Admiral Nimitz." - Maritime College, State University of New York web site, http://www.sunymaritime.edu/Maritime%20Museum/TrainingShipWing/stmarys.aspx, Accessed 2007. "...1903 graduate of the New York Nautical School, the institution out of which eventually emerged present day Maritime College. In that period, the School for all intents and purposes was conducted primarily aboard the St. Mary's, and it was on this ship that students eventually would sail to foreign ports." - The Frederick M. Hendrickson Class Of 1903 Student Papers by Nicholas J. Falco, Archivist, January 1999 - Deposited at the Archive/Maritime Historical Records Collection, Stephen B. Luce Library, SUNY Maritime College. [show more]
14941Merry Wings - Maine Sloop Boat
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
  • 1903 c.
"Merry Wing" was a Maine Sloop Boat, a centerboard sloop because Lewis Freeman Gott was from Gotts Island and he needed to be able to raise the centerboard to get into the Pool there. Lewis Freeman Gott won a cup for winning the Eagle Island Races three years in a row with "Merry Wing". The cup may be seen in the Tremont Historical Society Museum. "Local lore has it that she was the fastest sailboat in the area, and from time to time was entered in the early races held in the Great Harbor (Southwest Harbor - Northeast Harbor - Cranberry Isles neighborhood) under the auspices of the Northeast Harbor Fleet, and there proved her merit by beating everybody!" - The Newsletter of the Tremont Historical Society, Vol. 15, No. 1, Summer 2012, p. 1.
Description:
"Merry Wing" was a Maine Sloop Boat, a centerboard sloop because Lewis Freeman Gott was from Gotts Island and he needed to be able to raise the centerboard to get into the Pool there. Lewis Freeman Gott won a cup for winning the Eagle Island Races three years in a row with "Merry Wing". The cup may be seen in the Tremont Historical Society Museum. "Local lore has it that she was the fastest sailboat in the area, and from time to time was entered in the early races held in the Great Harbor (Southwest Harbor - Northeast Harbor - Cranberry Isles neighborhood) under the auspices of the Northeast Harbor Fleet, and there proved her merit by beating everybody!" - The Newsletter of the Tremont Historical Society, Vol. 15, No. 1, Summer 2012, p. 1. [show more]
13992Jack Tar - R-Class Racing Sloop
  • Reference
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
The 36’ R-class “Jack Tar” was built in 1916 by Wood & McClure, City Island, New York from designs by Tams, Lemoine & Crane (52 Pine Street, New York City) bought by John D. Rockefeller Jr. in 1920. “Jack Tar” may have been designed by Clinton H. Crane (1873-1958), the well-respected yacht designer and broker, a partner in the firm Tams, Lemoine & Crane. The company designed and built some of the best-known yachts of the time, including large ocean-worthy steam yachts. Crane’s specialty was the “race-about class” of boats, designed for speed in regattas and cup races. “In 1978, I got the job to rebuild an old R-class racing sloop for a member of the Rockefeller family. That was the “Jack Tar.” She was originally built in City Island, New York, in 1916 I believe, and the Rockefellers got her in 1920. That sloop stayed in the family for years, but finally sold her after they had a fiberglass boat built. The man who bought the “Jack Tar” took her to Portland and had her down there for awhile. He had quite a lot of work done on her from time to time. Then he got transferred to the West Coast, so he put her up for sale and the Rockefellers bought the boat back. They sailed her around that summer and then brought the sloop to me. By that time she really needed to be rebuilt, and that was quite a little job. Even the lead keel had to be melted down and recast. But she still sailed nice. You could take that boat when it was calm and just give her a push and she’d go forever. Every R-class sloop was a little different. Some had the mast stepped way aft. Some had the mast stepped way forward. And they were all sizes. That was fine, as long as they conformed to the rule that was written to rate these sailboats. Naturally, whenever somebody makes a rule like that, all the naval architects try to build a boat that will beat it. We didn’t have the original plans to go by but, of course, we had the old boat. When we saw her pulled apart, we took every other timber out and every other plank off. We put new timbers in, and then we replanked her. By doing it that way we could keep the shape about the way it was originally. The “Jack Tar” turned out pretty good.” - “Ralph Stanley : Tales of a Maine Boatbuilder” by Craig S. Milner and Ralph W. Stanley, published by Down East Books, Camden, Maine 2004, p. 99-100. "Father didn’t like sailing and rarely ventured out on the water. This was a great disappointment to Mother, who had been raised on Narragansett Bay among a family of sailors. Eventually Father bought a beautiful 36-foot racing sloop, an “R” boat named Jack Tar, undoubtedly as a concession to my older brothers. Being the youngest, I didn’t get much sailing time on it, although when I was 17 a friend and I sailed 100 miles east to Saint Andrews in New Brunswick, across the treacherous waters of Passamaquoddy Bay. Jack Tar had no engine, so Captain Oscar Bulger [Oscar Spurling Bulger (1872-1943)], who worked for the family for many years, followed along in his lobster boat in case we got into trouble." - From "Memoirs," by David Rockefeller, published by Random House, 2002. “…I think my wife [Margaret “Peggy” (McGrath) Rockefeller (1915-1996)] came to love [Mt. Desert] every bit as much as I did and we really learned to sail together. For many years we were allowed to use what was called the “Jack Tar,” which was a 36-foot sloop, with no engine, no head. A day-sailor. But she sailed beautifully, and fast, and we even did some racing in the August cruises…” – Interview with David Rockefeller by Kathleen W. Miller, “Chebacco: The Magazine of the Mount Desert Island Historical Society, Vol. XII 2011, p. 94.
Description:
The 36’ R-class “Jack Tar” was built in 1916 by Wood & McClure, City Island, New York from designs by Tams, Lemoine & Crane (52 Pine Street, New York City) bought by John D. Rockefeller Jr. in 1920. “Jack Tar” may have been designed by Clinton H. Crane (1873-1958), the well-respected yacht designer and broker, a partner in the firm Tams, Lemoine & Crane. The company designed and built some of the best-known yachts of the time, including large ocean-worthy steam yachts. Crane’s specialty was the “race-about class” of boats, designed for speed in regattas and cup races. “In 1978, I got the job to rebuild an old R-class racing sloop for a member of the Rockefeller family. That was the “Jack Tar.” She was originally built in City Island, New York, in 1916 I believe, and the Rockefellers got her in 1920. That sloop stayed in the family for years, but finally sold her after they had a fiberglass boat built. The man who bought the “Jack Tar” took her to Portland and had her down there for awhile. He had quite a lot of work done on her from time to time. Then he got transferred to the West Coast, so he put her up for sale and the Rockefellers bought the boat back. They sailed her around that summer and then brought the sloop to me. By that time she really needed to be rebuilt, and that was quite a little job. Even the lead keel had to be melted down and recast. But she still sailed nice. You could take that boat when it was calm and just give her a push and she’d go forever. Every R-class sloop was a little different. Some had the mast stepped way aft. Some had the mast stepped way forward. And they were all sizes. That was fine, as long as they conformed to the rule that was written to rate these sailboats. Naturally, whenever somebody makes a rule like that, all the naval architects try to build a boat that will beat it. We didn’t have the original plans to go by but, of course, we had the old boat. When we saw her pulled apart, we took every other timber out and every other plank off. We put new timbers in, and then we replanked her. By doing it that way we could keep the shape about the way it was originally. The “Jack Tar” turned out pretty good.” - “Ralph Stanley : Tales of a Maine Boatbuilder” by Craig S. Milner and Ralph W. Stanley, published by Down East Books, Camden, Maine 2004, p. 99-100. "Father didn’t like sailing and rarely ventured out on the water. This was a great disappointment to Mother, who had been raised on Narragansett Bay among a family of sailors. Eventually Father bought a beautiful 36-foot racing sloop, an “R” boat named Jack Tar, undoubtedly as a concession to my older brothers. Being the youngest, I didn’t get much sailing time on it, although when I was 17 a friend and I sailed 100 miles east to Saint Andrews in New Brunswick, across the treacherous waters of Passamaquoddy Bay. Jack Tar had no engine, so Captain Oscar Bulger [Oscar Spurling Bulger (1872-1943)], who worked for the family for many years, followed along in his lobster boat in case we got into trouble." - From "Memoirs," by David Rockefeller, published by Random House, 2002. “…I think my wife [Margaret “Peggy” (McGrath) Rockefeller (1915-1996)] came to love [Mt. Desert] every bit as much as I did and we really learned to sail together. For many years we were allowed to use what was called the “Jack Tar,” which was a 36-foot sloop, with no engine, no head. A day-sailor. But she sailed beautifully, and fast, and we even did some racing in the August cruises…” – Interview with David Rockefeller by Kathleen W. Miller, “Chebacco: The Magazine of the Mount Desert Island Historical Society, Vol. XII 2011, p. 94. [show more]
12013View of Sloop Boats North From King's Point, Manset
  • Image, Photograph
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
  • Southwest Harbor, Manset
11723Schooner Chromo and Sloop Rambler in Goose Cove, West Tremont
  • Image, Photograph
  • Places, Shore
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
  • Vessels, Ship, Sailing Ship, Schooner
  • Tremont, West Tremont
11651Rebuilding R-Class Racing Sloop Jack Tar
  • Image, Photograph
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
  • 1978
  • Southwest Harbor
  • 102 Clark Point Road
11653R-Class Racing Sloop Jack Tar - Rebuilt for Margaret Peggy (McGrath) Rockefeller
  • Image, Photograph
  • Businesses, Boatbuilding Business
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
  • 1978
  • Southwest Harbor
  • 102 Clark Point Road
11654R-Class Racing Sloop Jack Tar Before Rebuild
  • Image, Photograph
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
  • 1978
  • Southwest Harbor
  • 102 Clark Point Road
10477Samuel Champion Cooper's Cottage - The Larches - Joseph Walter Cooper Sailing His Maine Sloop Boat
  • Image, Photograph
  • People
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
  • Southwest Harbor
The wooden comb below the tiller of Joseph Walter Cooper's Maine Sloop Boat was a device made so that the tiller could be dropped in between the teeth of the comb so that a set course would not alter. A comb was particularly useful for single handed sailors.
Description:
The wooden comb below the tiller of Joseph Walter Cooper's Maine Sloop Boat was a device made so that the tiller could be dropped in between the teeth of the comb so that a set course would not alter. A comb was particularly useful for single handed sailors.
11652R-Class Racing Sloop Jack Tar Stripped to the Timbers
  • Image, Photograph, Photographic Print
  • Businesses, Boatbuilding Business
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
  • Westphal - David Westphal
  • 1978
  • Southwest Harbor
  • 102 Clark Point Road
9623Sloop Yacht "Sunshine" off High Head
  • Image, Photograph
  • Places, Shore
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
  • Slade - Marshall Perry Slade (1861-1950)
  • 1881
  • Mount Desert
11618Friendship Sloop Dictator - Plans for the Fiberglass Jarvis Newman 31
  • Document, Projection, Plan
  • Vessels, Boat, Sailboat, Sloop
  • Harriman - M. Harriman
  • Southwest Harbor, Manset
  • 14 Spar Lane
Backbone construction of 31’ Friendship Sloop Dictator, as designed and rebuilt by Ralph W. Stanley in 1972
Description:
Backbone construction of 31’ Friendship Sloop Dictator, as designed and rebuilt by Ralph W. Stanley in 1972