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Item Title Type Subject Creator Publisher Date Place Address Description
4006Unknown Structures
  • Set
  • Structures, Other Structures
These images depict structures that archivists have not yet identified. Please let us know if you know anything about these structures or the photos.
Description:
These images depict structures that archivists have not yet identified. Please let us know if you know anything about these structures or the photos.
13501Franklin Ward Machine Shop
Dockside Motel
XYZ Restaurant
  • Reference
  • Businesses, Restaurant Business
  • Structures, Commercial, Lodging, Motel
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • 48 Shore Road
Franklin Ward Machine Shop
Dockside Motel
XYZ Restaurant
12463Franklin Henry Ward
  • Image, Photograph
  • People
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • 1932 c.
  • Southwest Harbor, Manset
  • 48 Shore Road
5653Southwest Harbor Water Company - First Freeman Ridge Pump & Windmill
  • Image, Photograph
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • Bradley - Bryant Bradley (1838-1890)
  • 1895
  • Southwest Harbor
16183First Odd Fellows Building, Southwest Harbor
  • Image, Photograph, Photographic Print
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • Southwest Harbor
  • 357 Main Street
5057China Mill in Suncook Village, Pembroke NH
  • Image, Photograph, Photographic Print, Albumen Print
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • Rand - Henry Lathrop Rand (1862-1945)
  • 1909-10-20
  • Pembroke NH
16085Greetings from Bernard, Maine
  • Image, Photograph, Picture Postcard
  • People
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • Tremont, Bernard
14338Old Ward House
Benjamin Ward House
Customs House
  • Reference
  • Structures, Dwellings, House
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • Southwest Harbor, Manset
  • 136 Seawall Road
The original house was built in 1830 for Benjamin Ward and is one of the oldest still existing buildings in Southwest Harbor. The house once held the U.S. Customs House [T-184] and was sold by Eldora Dolliver Ward to sea captain William W. King in 1905 (426/105). It was sold by Lottie King Reed to Emery Norwood in 1946 (712/121). Emery died July 22, 1953, leaving as heir-at-law Edna G. Hurd Norwood, who lived in the house until she sold it to John Eugene Jacobson in 1975 (1209/647). The shed ell was reported to have belonged to Albert “Uncle Al” King, who used it as a boat shed on the shore of 373 Seawall Road. The small barn in the rear is Jake Jacobson’s shop. (map 1, lot 44) - Burnham, John, Rebecca. - Our Neighborhood – Manset and Seawall (Southwest Harbor Historical Society, Southwest Harbor, 2015) 78-79.
Old Ward House
Benjamin Ward House
Customs House
Description:
The original house was built in 1830 for Benjamin Ward and is one of the oldest still existing buildings in Southwest Harbor. The house once held the U.S. Customs House [T-184] and was sold by Eldora Dolliver Ward to sea captain William W. King in 1905 (426/105). It was sold by Lottie King Reed to Emery Norwood in 1946 (712/121). Emery died July 22, 1953, leaving as heir-at-law Edna G. Hurd Norwood, who lived in the house until she sold it to John Eugene Jacobson in 1975 (1209/647). The shed ell was reported to have belonged to Albert “Uncle Al” King, who used it as a boat shed on the shore of 373 Seawall Road. The small barn in the rear is Jake Jacobson’s shop. (map 1, lot 44) - Burnham, John, Rebecca. - Our Neighborhood – Manset and Seawall (Southwest Harbor Historical Society, Southwest Harbor, 2015) 78-79. [show more]
11267Stanley Fisheries Ice House
  • Image, Photograph
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • Southwest Harbor, Manset
12062Theodore P. Austin's Cottage - The Austin Castle
  • Image, Photograph
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • Hancock ME
13120Longfellow Park
  • Reference
  • Places, Park
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • Boston MA area, Cambridge
13381Odd Fellows Hall
  • Reference
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • Southwest Harbor
  • 357 Main Street
3554Austin's Castle
  • Reference
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • Franklin ME
Built by Theodore P. Austin, a New York jeweler, who invested in Hancock Country mining. He died before the construction was complete. The 42 room castle was never completed, although Austin's two daughters lived in the one finished room for many years.
Description:
Built by Theodore P. Austin, a New York jeweler, who invested in Hancock Country mining. He died before the construction was complete. The 42 room castle was never completed, although Austin's two daughters lived in the one finished room for many years.
9135Marion Quincy Winslow Rand at Balsam Hut
  • Image, Photograph, Photographic Print, Albumen Print
  • People
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • Rand - Henry Lathrop Rand (1862-1945)
  • 1908-09-20
There is a splint-ash chair in the hut and bunches of balsam branches apparently on a bench. The outside of the hut had a sapling trellis attached to the surface of the building. Balsam branches were attached to it.
Description:
There is a splint-ash chair in the hut and bunches of balsam branches apparently on a bench. The outside of the hut had a sapling trellis attached to the surface of the building. Balsam branches were attached to it.
9152Marion Quincy Winslow Rand and Arnold Augustus Rand at "Fox Dens" Avenue Shelter
  • Image, Photograph, Photographic Print, Albumen Print
  • People
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • Rand - Henry Lathrop Rand (1862-1945)
  • 1910-08-29
  • Southwest Harbor
9942Unknown Building with 1911 Ford Model T
  • Image, Photograph, Photographic Print
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • Transportation, Automobile
The automobile is probably a 1911 Ford Model T with acetelyne head lamps.
Description:
The automobile is probably a 1911 Ford Model T with acetelyne head lamps.
5586Old Masonic Hall and J.T. Crippen Company
  • Image, Photograph
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • 1881 c.
  • Southwest Harbor
  • 353 Main Street
The Tremont Masonic Lodge #77, after it was raised and enlarged, at the corner of Main Street and Clark Point Road in Southwest Harbor. The building to the right of it was the Odd Fellows Hall, destroyed by fire on March 27, 1922. The front entrance (as shown) was on Main Street. A lobby and auditorium with stage were on that floor. Town meetings and other gatherings were held in the auditorium for many years. The top floor held the lodge hall. At the far left is A. Gilley's Barber Shop, and, to the right of it is R.J. Lemont's Drug Store. The shield sign to the right of that marks the store of the "Live Yankee." The business on the bottom floor (access from Clark Point Road) of the Old Masonic Hall is the J.T. Crippen Co. - musical instruments and supplies.
Description:
The Tremont Masonic Lodge #77, after it was raised and enlarged, at the corner of Main Street and Clark Point Road in Southwest Harbor. The building to the right of it was the Odd Fellows Hall, destroyed by fire on March 27, 1922. The front entrance (as shown) was on Main Street. A lobby and auditorium with stage were on that floor. Town meetings and other gatherings were held in the auditorium for many years. The top floor held the lodge hall. At the far left is A. Gilley's Barber Shop, and, to the right of it is R.J. Lemont's Drug Store. The shield sign to the right of that marks the store of the "Live Yankee." The business on the bottom floor (access from Clark Point Road) of the Old Masonic Hall is the J.T. Crippen Co. - musical instruments and supplies. [show more]
5587Old Masonic Hall and Odd Fellows Building
  • Image, Photograph
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • 1881 c.
  • Southwest Harbor
The Tremont Masonic Lodge #77 at the corner of Main Street and Clark Point Road in Southwest Harbor and the Odd Fellows building on the right.
Description:
The Tremont Masonic Lodge #77 at the corner of Main Street and Clark Point Road in Southwest Harbor and the Odd Fellows building on the right.
12311The Mill Race at Schooner Head
Waterfall at Schooner Head
  • Image, Photograph
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • Allen - Edward Lowe Allen (c. 1830-1914)
  • 1865 c.
  • Bar Harbor, Eden
Stereograph sometimes listed as "Waterfall at Schooner Head" and other times as "Mill Race at Schooner Head", Probably at the William Lynam Homestead, Eden, Maine.
The Mill Race at Schooner Head
Waterfall at Schooner Head
Description:
Stereograph sometimes listed as "Waterfall at Schooner Head" and other times as "Mill Race at Schooner Head", Probably at the William Lynam Homestead, Eden, Maine.
7179Montelle D. Gott's Buildings at the Outer Pool on Great Gott Island
  • Image, Photograph
  • Places, Shore
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • Tremont, Great Gott Island
12143New Buildings at Jackson Memorial Laboratory
  • Image, Photograph
  • Businesses, Other Business
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • Ballard - Willis Humphreys Ballard (1906-1980)
  • 1949-02-15
  • 600 Main Street
The Kebo Valley Club Race Track is visible behind the newly constructed buildings at the Jackson Lab. Originally the site of Robin Hood Park.
Description:
The Kebo Valley Club Race Track is visible behind the newly constructed buildings at the Jackson Lab. Originally the site of Robin Hood Park.
9122Chelsea Fire Ruins (Bellingham Hill from Chester Avenue)
  • Image, Photograph, Photographic Print, Albumen Print
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • Rand - Henry Lathrop Rand (1862-1945)
  • 1908-04-17
  • Massachusetts, State
  • Chester Avenue
12787Castle in Maine Mournful Relic of Mining Boom
  • Publication, Clipping
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • The Pueblo Indicator
  • 1937-07-17
Castle in Maine Mournful Relic of Mining Boom: Two Aging Sisters and 20 Cats Dwell in Unfinished Manor of the 1870s. Also known as Austin's Castle. The Pueblo Indicator, Pueblo, Colorado July 17, 1937
Description:
Castle in Maine Mournful Relic of Mining Boom: Two Aging Sisters and 20 Cats Dwell in Unfinished Manor of the 1870s. Also known as Austin's Castle. The Pueblo Indicator, Pueblo, Colorado July 17, 1937
15280Try House at Try House Point, Bernard
  • Reference
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • Tremont, Bernard
"It is a little known fact that Mount Desert Island men participated in one of America's earliest and most storied industries - whaling. In 1776 Benjamin Benson, great grandfather of Ralph Benson of Bernard, sailed out of New Bedford, Massachusetts, in the whaling vessel which he captained, He finally dropped anchor at Bass Harbor, which he selected as a base for his operations. He built a try house on a point of land at the mouth of the harbor and used his ship and crew for hunting whales in the surrounding waters, particularly near Mt. Desert Rock. The try house, a small frame structure, stood on the point behind the present home of Farrell Davisson almost directly across the harbor from the Underwood sardine plant until it was finally demolished about 1910. By the time the building was torn down the equipment used in the rendering process was gone. However, Ralph Benson owns the muzzle-loading gun for shooting, the harpoon and a whale oil lamp. The grapnel used for hauling the whale behind the ship is also in Bernard. Whalebone, which was discarded during the oil extracting process, is still occasionally dug up from the sand during, excavations along the shore of the harbor. The whale was located by the ship. When one was found, a part of the crew put out in a small boat and carefully rowed as near the prey as possible. The whale was shot with a harpoon from the muzzle-loading gun. If the carcass sank, it was raised with a four-hook grapnel weighing about 200 pounds and towed by the ship to the rendering plant. The several inch thick layer of blubber under the skin was the only part of the whale used here. The blubber was stripped off and placed in huge iron kettles to cook over a slow fire. The round-bottomed kettles, holding about 150 gallons each, were some four and a half feet in diameter at the top. A flat lip encircling the rim was supported on a brick fireplace holding the kettle off the fire beneath. The oil thus rendered was used as the fuel in whale oil lamps, which were the first development for home lighting after candles. The little lamp in Mr. Benson's possession was part of the stock of his grandfather's general store located on the same site as Benson's present wharf. The clear glass base, which held the fuel, is about eight inches across the bottom and tapering to the top. The opening is capped with metal on which there are two small spouts through which the wicks were run. There was no chimney to the lamp. The whale oil trying industry lasted until about 1860 or 1870 when the discovery and development of petroleum wrote a finis to it. Whales, some of them 80 feet in length, are still seen in the waters around here yet. Mr. Benson saw one recently when he was out fishing, and we have one or two other reports of them this season. A good-sized whale can create a hazard for a small boat. They apparently like to rise under a boat which is 1 riding without its motor running to 1 scratch their backs on the vessel's bottom, Without the least malevolence on the part of the whale, this can make for difficulties. Around here whales usually appear in June and are gone in September. They pasture on plankton, the same food as that eaten by the herring. "Plankton," says one writer, "is to the sea what grass is to the land - the basic food. All forms of plankton are very small, often microscopic...!” One authority has figured that in the food chain of the sea it would take 1 million pounds s of mackerel flesh (fragment missing). If your arithmetic is better than ours, perhaps you can figure out how many pounds it would take to support a whale from which 150 gallons of oil were rendered. The try house at Bass Harbor was run by Benson from the time it was built until the process was discontinued. At one time there were four Benjamin Bensons in the community. The original one who came from New Bedford was called “Grand Sir.” He had a son named for him who was called “Just Plain Ben.” One of Grand Sir's daughters married another Benjamin Benson who had come here from New Hampshire. He was called “Country Ben.” Just Plain Ben had a son also named Benjamin. He was called “Little Ben.” - “MDI's Short Lived Whaling Industry Began In Bass Harbor” by LaRue Spiker appeared in the Bar Harbor Times on November 3, 1960 and was reprinted in the Tremont Historical Society Newsletter - V5 #3 - July, 2001. Atlantic Menhaden Brevoortia tyrannus (A.K.A. - Alewife, Bunker, Pogy, Bugmouth, Fat-Back) "And lastly, there are the Menhaden. More often called “Pogies” here in Maine, they once provided a robust seine fishery that rivaled herring. The Pogies were a great source of oil. Their oil and fat content were suitable for extraction. Ground-up fish were cooked in big kettles (try-pots) much the same way that whale blubber was and the resultant oil was valuable. That was all before my time and it is legend now. But the names remain. “Try-House Point”, “Fish House Point” and “Try-Kettle Cove” are still here even though the reasons for their names have long since gone." www.fishermensvoice.com/archives/atlanticstatesnews0905.html, Accessed 2007. “The Menhaden Fishery - It is claimed by the fishermen of Surry that the menhaden fishery of the United States originated with the people of that town. For many years menhaden were abundant in all of the shore-waters of the district, being particularly so in Frenchman's and Union Bays. At first they were taken only in small numbers for use as bait in the shore-fisheries, but later, when it was discovered that marketable oil could be obtained from them, the fishery increased enormously, and hundreds of fishermen provided themselves with nets and kettles for engaging in the work. Between 1855 and 1863 it is estimated that not less than a hundred try-houses, with two to four kettles each, were in operation between Lamoine and Gouldsboro. Since 1870 the fishery has been less important, and for a number of years, owing to the absence of menhaden from these waters, it has been entirely discontinued.” - The Fisheries and Fishery Industries of the United States by George Brown Goode, Washington Government Printing Office. Section II, p. 28 – 1887 “Since the days of Captain John Smith, 1614, no systematic attempt to capture Fin Whales on the coast of New England appears to have been made until about 1810, when according to R. E. Earll, a shore-fishery was begun and successfully prosecuted for a number of years, from Prospect Harbor, in Frenchman's Bay, Maine. This industry was undertaken by Stephen Clark and L. Hiller, of Rochester, Mass., who "came to the region, and built try-works on the shore, having their lookout station on the top of an adjoining hill. The whales usually followed the menhaden to the shore, arriving about the 1st of June, and remaining till September... Ten years later they began using small vessels in the fishery, and by this means were enabled to go farther from land. The fishery was at its height between 1835 and 1840 when an average of six or seven whales were taken yearly... The business was discontinued about 1860, since which date but one or two whales have been taken." It is probable that Humpback Whales constituted the chief part of the catch, if indeed any others were taken at all. Clark further informs us that "shore-whaling in the vicinity of Tremont, [Maine] began about 1840. Mr. Benjamin Beaver and a small crew of men caught three or more whales annually for about twenty years, but gave up the business in 1860. No more whales were taken from this time till the spring of 1880, when one was taken and brought into Bass Harbor, and yielded 1,200 gallons of oil but no bone of value.” - “The Whalebone Whales of New England” by Glover Morrill Allen, published by the Boston Society of Natural History, printed for the society with aid from the Gurdon Saltonstall Fund, 1916
Description:
"It is a little known fact that Mount Desert Island men participated in one of America's earliest and most storied industries - whaling. In 1776 Benjamin Benson, great grandfather of Ralph Benson of Bernard, sailed out of New Bedford, Massachusetts, in the whaling vessel which he captained, He finally dropped anchor at Bass Harbor, which he selected as a base for his operations. He built a try house on a point of land at the mouth of the harbor and used his ship and crew for hunting whales in the surrounding waters, particularly near Mt. Desert Rock. The try house, a small frame structure, stood on the point behind the present home of Farrell Davisson almost directly across the harbor from the Underwood sardine plant until it was finally demolished about 1910. By the time the building was torn down the equipment used in the rendering process was gone. However, Ralph Benson owns the muzzle-loading gun for shooting, the harpoon and a whale oil lamp. The grapnel used for hauling the whale behind the ship is also in Bernard. Whalebone, which was discarded during the oil extracting process, is still occasionally dug up from the sand during, excavations along the shore of the harbor. The whale was located by the ship. When one was found, a part of the crew put out in a small boat and carefully rowed as near the prey as possible. The whale was shot with a harpoon from the muzzle-loading gun. If the carcass sank, it was raised with a four-hook grapnel weighing about 200 pounds and towed by the ship to the rendering plant. The several inch thick layer of blubber under the skin was the only part of the whale used here. The blubber was stripped off and placed in huge iron kettles to cook over a slow fire. The round-bottomed kettles, holding about 150 gallons each, were some four and a half feet in diameter at the top. A flat lip encircling the rim was supported on a brick fireplace holding the kettle off the fire beneath. The oil thus rendered was used as the fuel in whale oil lamps, which were the first development for home lighting after candles. The little lamp in Mr. Benson's possession was part of the stock of his grandfather's general store located on the same site as Benson's present wharf. The clear glass base, which held the fuel, is about eight inches across the bottom and tapering to the top. The opening is capped with metal on which there are two small spouts through which the wicks were run. There was no chimney to the lamp. The whale oil trying industry lasted until about 1860 or 1870 when the discovery and development of petroleum wrote a finis to it. Whales, some of them 80 feet in length, are still seen in the waters around here yet. Mr. Benson saw one recently when he was out fishing, and we have one or two other reports of them this season. A good-sized whale can create a hazard for a small boat. They apparently like to rise under a boat which is 1 riding without its motor running to 1 scratch their backs on the vessel's bottom, Without the least malevolence on the part of the whale, this can make for difficulties. Around here whales usually appear in June and are gone in September. They pasture on plankton, the same food as that eaten by the herring. "Plankton," says one writer, "is to the sea what grass is to the land - the basic food. All forms of plankton are very small, often microscopic...!” One authority has figured that in the food chain of the sea it would take 1 million pounds s of mackerel flesh (fragment missing). If your arithmetic is better than ours, perhaps you can figure out how many pounds it would take to support a whale from which 150 gallons of oil were rendered. The try house at Bass Harbor was run by Benson from the time it was built until the process was discontinued. At one time there were four Benjamin Bensons in the community. The original one who came from New Bedford was called “Grand Sir.” He had a son named for him who was called “Just Plain Ben.” One of Grand Sir's daughters married another Benjamin Benson who had come here from New Hampshire. He was called “Country Ben.” Just Plain Ben had a son also named Benjamin. He was called “Little Ben.” - “MDI's Short Lived Whaling Industry Began In Bass Harbor” by LaRue Spiker appeared in the Bar Harbor Times on November 3, 1960 and was reprinted in the Tremont Historical Society Newsletter - V5 #3 - July, 2001. Atlantic Menhaden Brevoortia tyrannus (A.K.A. - Alewife, Bunker, Pogy, Bugmouth, Fat-Back) "And lastly, there are the Menhaden. More often called “Pogies” here in Maine, they once provided a robust seine fishery that rivaled herring. The Pogies were a great source of oil. Their oil and fat content were suitable for extraction. Ground-up fish were cooked in big kettles (try-pots) much the same way that whale blubber was and the resultant oil was valuable. That was all before my time and it is legend now. But the names remain. “Try-House Point”, “Fish House Point” and “Try-Kettle Cove” are still here even though the reasons for their names have long since gone." www.fishermensvoice.com/archives/atlanticstatesnews0905.html, Accessed 2007. “The Menhaden Fishery - It is claimed by the fishermen of Surry that the menhaden fishery of the United States originated with the people of that town. For many years menhaden were abundant in all of the shore-waters of the district, being particularly so in Frenchman's and Union Bays. At first they were taken only in small numbers for use as bait in the shore-fisheries, but later, when it was discovered that marketable oil could be obtained from them, the fishery increased enormously, and hundreds of fishermen provided themselves with nets and kettles for engaging in the work. Between 1855 and 1863 it is estimated that not less than a hundred try-houses, with two to four kettles each, were in operation between Lamoine and Gouldsboro. Since 1870 the fishery has been less important, and for a number of years, owing to the absence of menhaden from these waters, it has been entirely discontinued.” - The Fisheries and Fishery Industries of the United States by George Brown Goode, Washington Government Printing Office. Section II, p. 28 – 1887 “Since the days of Captain John Smith, 1614, no systematic attempt to capture Fin Whales on the coast of New England appears to have been made until about 1810, when according to R. E. Earll, a shore-fishery was begun and successfully prosecuted for a number of years, from Prospect Harbor, in Frenchman's Bay, Maine. This industry was undertaken by Stephen Clark and L. Hiller, of Rochester, Mass., who "came to the region, and built try-works on the shore, having their lookout station on the top of an adjoining hill. The whales usually followed the menhaden to the shore, arriving about the 1st of June, and remaining till September... Ten years later they began using small vessels in the fishery, and by this means were enabled to go farther from land. The fishery was at its height between 1835 and 1840 when an average of six or seven whales were taken yearly... The business was discontinued about 1860, since which date but one or two whales have been taken." It is probable that Humpback Whales constituted the chief part of the catch, if indeed any others were taken at all. Clark further informs us that "shore-whaling in the vicinity of Tremont, [Maine] began about 1840. Mr. Benjamin Beaver and a small crew of men caught three or more whales annually for about twenty years, but gave up the business in 1860. No more whales were taken from this time till the spring of 1880, when one was taken and brought into Bass Harbor, and yielded 1,200 gallons of oil but no bone of value.” - “The Whalebone Whales of New England” by Glover Morrill Allen, published by the Boston Society of Natural History, printed for the society with aid from the Gurdon Saltonstall Fund, 1916 [show more]
15113Jackson Laboratory
  • Reference
  • Businesses, Other Business
  • Structures, Other Structures
  • Bar Harbor
  • 600 Main Street
Originally the site of Robin Hood Park
Description:
Originally the site of Robin Hood Park