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You searched for: Subject: is exactly 'Structures, Dwelling, House'
Item Title Type Subject Creator Publisher Date Place Address Description
15772Ralph Richardson Sawyer HouseReferenceStructures, Dwelling, House
15633Mandy Turner HouseReferenceStructures, Dwelling, HouseKathlyn L. Murphy Reed was born in this house.
Description:
Kathlyn L. Murphy Reed was born in this house.
15631198 Aspinwall Ave. HouseReferenceStructures, Dwelling, HouseBrookline198 Aspinwall Avenue
15609Robert Malcom Carter HouseImage, PhotographStructures, Dwelling, HouseSoules - George John Soules2016-08Southwest Harbor27 Forest AveThese photos were taken after the home was purchased by George and Janice Soules in 2013. Above - August 2016. The view is looking south down Forest Avenue toward Main Street. 1 - August 2016 showing 2014 addition in back 2 - July 2013 3 - July 2013
Description:
These photos were taken after the home was purchased by George and Janice Soules in 2013. Above - August 2016. The view is looking south down Forest Avenue toward Main Street. 1 - August 2016 showing 2014 addition in back 2 - July 2013 3 - July 2013
15607Robert Malcom Carter Family PhotosImage, PhotographPeople
Structures, Dwelling, House
Southwest Harbor27 Forest AvenuePhotos taken around the Carter home at 27 Forest Avenue in Southwest Harbor, Maine. Above - Robert Malcolm Carter (1905-1975) and one of his cocker spaniels – all named Polly. The house had a wood furnace until c. 1963. March 1941 1 - William “Bill” Carter (1941-) next to a fish trap. 2 - Mildred G. Norwood Carter, Mrs. Robert Malcolm Carter (1910-1988), next to a Bleeding Heart plant – the photograph shows the location of the back door before the milk room was built. 3 - William “Bill” Carter next to the pen built to keep him safe from cars. Bill would get out and drag the pen around the yard. 4 - Elizabeth “Betty” Jane Carter (1944-) – Mrs. Albert M. Chipman, on back steps. 5 - Mildred Norwood Carter, Mrs. Robert Malcolm Carter, and child on back steps. 6 - William R. Carter – house in background is his uncle’s house Jasper Chamberlain Hutchins, 22 Forest Avenue. 7 - William Robert Carter and Robert Malcolm Carter on back porch with milk bottles.
Description:
Photos taken around the Carter home at 27 Forest Avenue in Southwest Harbor, Maine. Above - Robert Malcolm Carter (1905-1975) and one of his cocker spaniels – all named Polly. The house had a wood furnace until c. 1963. March 1941 1 - William “Bill” Carter (1941-) next to a fish trap. 2 - Mildred G. Norwood Carter, Mrs. Robert Malcolm Carter (1910-1988), next to a Bleeding Heart plant – the photograph shows the location of the back door before the milk room was built. 3 - William “Bill” Carter next to the pen built to keep him safe from cars. Bill would get out and drag the pen around the yard. 4 - Elizabeth “Betty” Jane Carter (1944-) – Mrs. Albert M. Chipman, on back steps. 5 - Mildred Norwood Carter, Mrs. Robert Malcolm Carter, and child on back steps. 6 - William R. Carter – house in background is his uncle’s house Jasper Chamberlain Hutchins, 22 Forest Avenue. 7 - William Robert Carter and Robert Malcolm Carter on back porch with milk bottles. [show more]
15605Robert Malcom Carter HouseReferenceStructures, Dwelling, HouseRich - Meredith Adelle (Rich) Hutchins (1939-2016)
Riebel - Charlotte Helen (Riebel) Morrill
Southwest Harbor27 Forest Avenue
15543The Callender HouseImage, Photograph, DigitalStructures, Dwelling, HouseSoules - George John Soules2016-03-05The Callender House was the first summer cottage built of brick in Bar Harbor. When this photograph was taken in 2016, the Jackson Lab owned this structure which is located on the Schooner Head Road just outside of Bar Harbor. The history of Bar Harbor is the history of the rich and famous and the story of the Callendar House fits right into this history. The imposing “cottage” was built in 1901 for Mrs. John Callendar Livingston, a member of the prominent and incredibly prosperous Livingston family, by Fredrick Savage. The structure was Savage’s most formal design and also the most expensive (partly because just before it was completed in 1901, the entire building burnt leading to a near complete rebuilding). Savage, himself, was a native of Northeast Harbor and the vast majority of his work consisted of cottages and hotels, showing the rise of Bar Harbor’s place as a “summer colony”. Savage built cottages in many styles including several prominent Queen Anne and Shingle Style structures showcasing the dominant design trends of the late 19th century and early 20th century. The Callender House, however, can be seen as firmly colonial revival in design and was the first summer “cottage” built with brick. At the time of its construction it was praised by the Bar Harbor Record for both its refinement and its modernity. In 1992, the Callendar House was purchased by the Jackson Lab at a foreclosure auction. (Source: Maine Preservation).
Description:
The Callender House was the first summer cottage built of brick in Bar Harbor. When this photograph was taken in 2016, the Jackson Lab owned this structure which is located on the Schooner Head Road just outside of Bar Harbor. The history of Bar Harbor is the history of the rich and famous and the story of the Callendar House fits right into this history. The imposing “cottage” was built in 1901 for Mrs. John Callendar Livingston, a member of the prominent and incredibly prosperous Livingston family, by Fredrick Savage. The structure was Savage’s most formal design and also the most expensive (partly because just before it was completed in 1901, the entire building burnt leading to a near complete rebuilding). Savage, himself, was a native of Northeast Harbor and the vast majority of his work consisted of cottages and hotels, showing the rise of Bar Harbor’s place as a “summer colony”. Savage built cottages in many styles including several prominent Queen Anne and Shingle Style structures showcasing the dominant design trends of the late 19th century and early 20th century. The Callender House, however, can be seen as firmly colonial revival in design and was the first summer “cottage” built with brick. At the time of its construction it was praised by the Bar Harbor Record for both its refinement and its modernity. In 1992, the Callendar House was purchased by the Jackson Lab at a foreclosure auction. (Source: Maine Preservation). [show more]
15540Peter Stanley HouseReferenceStructures, Dwelling, House86 Seawall Road
15527Collista F. (Mullen) Gott's HouseReferenceStructures, Dwelling, HouseTremont, Bass Harbor, McKinley
15524Jonathan Stewart's Neighborhood - Aberdeen, Scotland.ReferenceStructures, Dwelling, HouseAberdeen, Scotland
15522Eliza S. Robbins House
Fred M. Robbins House
ReferenceStructures, Dwelling, HouseRea - William H. Rea1895Southwest Harbor225 Main Street"Fred Robbins had his house built by William H. Rea. During the years that Mr, Robbins was employed as a lighthouse keeper, the house was rented and so he built the small cottage to the south of his home as a place where he and his wife could spend their annual vacations." - “Traditions and Records of Southwest Harbor and Somesville, Mount Desert Island, Maine” by Mrs. Seth S. Thornton, 1938, p. 143.
Eliza S. Robbins House
Fred M. Robbins House
Description:
"Fred Robbins had his house built by William H. Rea. During the years that Mr, Robbins was employed as a lighthouse keeper, the house was rented and so he built the small cottage to the south of his home as a place where he and his wife could spend their annual vacations." - “Traditions and Records of Southwest Harbor and Somesville, Mount Desert Island, Maine” by Mrs. Seth S. Thornton, 1938, p. 143.
15392Mrs. Seth Sprague Thornton (Nell Rebecca (Carroll) Thornton) with Minnie.Image, Photograph, PrintPeople
Structures, Dwelling, House
Carroll - Nellie Rebecca (Carroll) Thornton (1871-1958)1907 c.Houlton26 Charles StreetNellie was sentimental about her life. The title for this photograph included a reference to her other cat, "Moses wants his picture too."
Description:
Nellie was sentimental about her life. The title for this photograph included a reference to her other cat, "Moses wants his picture too."
15334Elmer Ellsworth Smallidge House
Robert Lindsay Smallidge Sr. House
ReferenceStructures, Dwelling, HouseMount Desert, Northeast Harbor93 Summit Road
Elmer Ellsworth Smallidge House
Robert Lindsay Smallidge Sr. House
15312Mildred G. (Butler) Freeman HouseReferenceStructures, Dwelling, House
15307John E. Hamblen HouseReferenceStructures, Dwelling, House1956 c.Tremont, Bass Harbor, McKinley181 Harbor Drive
15303Flora Belle (Butler) Murphy Lawton HouseReferenceStructures, Dwelling, House
15297William S. Trask and Belle M. (Higgins) Trask HouseReferenceStructures, Dwelling, HouseTremont, Great Gott Island
15285George S. and Lillian B. (Walls) Hodgdon HouseReferenceStructures, Dwelling, HouseTremont, Seal CoveCape Road
15264John Morgan Gott Sr. HouseReferenceStructures, Dwelling, HouseTremont
15221Nathaniel Southgate Shaler’s Cottage, “Seven Gates," on Martha’s Vineyard,ReferenceStructures, Dwelling, House
15218The Fairbanks House, Dedham, MassachusettsReferenceStructures, Dwelling, HouseDedham511 East Street"The Fairbanks House is believed to be the oldest surviving timber frame house in North America. It was built for a family of Puritan immigrants from Yorkshire in England, Jonathan and Grace Fairebanke and their six children. Dendrochonology (tree ring dating) has confirmed a construction date of the late 1630s-early 1640s. The house was passed down to succeeding generations of the family until the early twentieth century. In all, eight generations of the Fairbanks family lived in the house. Through the Fairbanks Family in America, Inc., the extended Fairbanks family still owns the property." - “The Oldest Timber Frame House,” The Fairbanks House Historical Site, Accessed online 01/02/09; http://www.fairbankshouse.org/ Visit this site for the history of the house and how to visit it.
Description:
"The Fairbanks House is believed to be the oldest surviving timber frame house in North America. It was built for a family of Puritan immigrants from Yorkshire in England, Jonathan and Grace Fairebanke and their six children. Dendrochonology (tree ring dating) has confirmed a construction date of the late 1630s-early 1640s. The house was passed down to succeeding generations of the family until the early twentieth century. In all, eight generations of the Fairbanks family lived in the house. Through the Fairbanks Family in America, Inc., the extended Fairbanks family still owns the property." - “The Oldest Timber Frame House,” The Fairbanks House Historical Site, Accessed online 01/02/09; http://www.fairbankshouse.org/ Visit this site for the history of the house and how to visit it. [show more]
15216George Kennard Hooper HouseReferenceStructures, Dwelling, HouseDedham
15203Jefferson Torrey HouseReferenceStructures, Dwelling, House
15198Ansel Lyman Harper HouseReferenceStructures, Dwelling, HouseTremont
15173Samuel G. Rich HouseReferenceStructures, Dwelling, HouseTremont, Bernard249 Tremont Road"This house was built for Samuel G. Rich, after he purchased the land in 1837. The exact construction date is unclear." - "The Historic Homes of the Town of Tremont…A perspective in Time," p. 25 - Published by the Tremont Historical Society, July 1998. Samuel G. Rich (c. 1808-1871)
Description:
"This house was built for Samuel G. Rich, after he purchased the land in 1837. The exact construction date is unclear." - "The Historic Homes of the Town of Tremont…A perspective in Time," p. 25 - Published by the Tremont Historical Society, July 1998. Samuel G. Rich (c. 1808-1871)